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    The SCA Map of Alberta reflects the integration of inherent agroclimatic conditions that exist across Alberta with soil development, use and management practices. The SCA boundaries coincide to a large degree with recognized climate zones in Alberta. These boundaries also generally agree with accepted ecoregion boundaries. In the agricultural portion of Alberta, SCA’s correlate strongly with soil zone lines with further subdivisions reflecting recognized agroclimate zones.

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    The Alberta Regeneration Information System (ARIS) requires a unique identifier assigned to a cutblock to enable tracking within ARIS. This number is generated from a point roughly derived from the centre of the cutblock. The number is a concatenation of the point's legal description plus a grid cell number. The format is MRRTTTSSGG where M - Meridian, RR - Range, TTT - Township, SS - Section, GG - grid cell. The MRRTTSS information is derived with reference to the Alberta Township System. The grid cell is derived from a 10 by 10 grid that is overlaid on the section that the centre of the cutblock is contained in. Grid cells are numbered between 00 - 99 with the grid origin at the bottom left corner of the section and anchored to the centre of grid cell 00. The first digit represents the grid column and the second digit is the grid row of the 10 by 10 matrix. Note that in some cases a letter may be appended to the end of the opening number where an opening number had to be split between two cutblocks for some reason. For example, cutblocks may have the same basic opening number but one is differentiated from the other with one having an A and the other having a B appended to the end of the base opening number.This dataset contains all the potential opening numbers in the Green Area of the province, either as a whole or by Forest Management Unit (FMU).

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    This map displays an assessment of soil erosion risk for the agricultural area of Alberta. Loss of protective residue cover through cultivation will increase the potential risk of soil erosion. The vulnerability of the soil to erosion combined with the intensity of cultivation determines the degree to which the soil may be at risk. The classes shown on the map were ranked from 0 (lowest risk) to 1 (highest risk). This resource was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.

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    This dataset is produced for the Government of Alberta and is available to the general public. Note that the distribution contact is different for the general public than for Government of Alberta ministries. Please consult the Distribution Information of this metadata for the appropriate contact to acquire this dataset.The Forest Management Agreement Area dataset is comprised of all the polygons that represent the areas of land which the Province of Alberta agrees upon Forest Management Agreement holders having the rights to establish, grow, harvest and remove timber.

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    The data represents the relative cultivation intensity in the agricultural area of Alberta. Cultivation intensity refers to the frequency of cultivation associated with the following management systems: no till, conventional tillage and summerfallow. It is an estimate of the degree to which cultivation contributes to wind and water erosion. The classes shown on the map are ranked between 0 (lowest) and 1 (highest).This map was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.

  • This map displays the distribution of the main soil types found within the province of Alberta. The distribution pattern of soils in Alberta is strongly linked to climate and parent materials. Climate affects the location of different soil groups. The driest area in southeastern Alberta is represented by the presence of Brown Chernozems. As one proceeds north and west, the soils and associated vegetation reflect the increase in available moisture.In Alberta, Organic soils generally occur in association with Luvisolic soils. These soils form under wet conditions where the organic layer (greater than 30% organic matter) accumulates faster than it decomposes. The organic layer varies in thickness from 40 to 160+ cm, and under natural conditions, the water table is at or near the surface. In some areas of the province, Organic soils may be artificially drained and used for agricultural production. This resource was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.

  • The data represents the annual total precipitation in Alberta over the 30-year period from 1971 to 2000. A 30-year period is used to describe the present climate since it is enough time to filter our short-term fluctuations but is not dominated by any long-term trend in the climate. Annual total precipitation refers to rain, snow and other forms of moisture such as hail. Annual precipitation is greatest in the mountains and decreases at lower elevations. In the agricultural areas of the province, 50 to60 percent of annual precipitation generally occurs during the growing season, mostly as rain.Precipitation in any month can be extremely variable with the variability of precipitation being greater in southern Alberta than in the Peace River Region and central Alberta. However, long-term (30-year) data provides a reliable indication of what to expect in any given location. Climate information is used as a long-term planning tool, in selecting a location for a farm or planning a cropping program. Crop producers generally look at the most likely weather conditions rather than the extremes because the key inputs and decisions are made well in advance of achieving results. By combining knowledge of the agricultural operation with knowledge of what is likely to happen (climate), the producer can then decide on the acceptable level of risk due to adverse conditions. This resource was created using ArcGIS

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    An administrative unit of forest land designated by the Minister, as authorized under Section 14(1) of the Forests Act.

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    The data represents an assessment of biodiversity risk for the agricultural area of Alberta in 2002. Biodiversity risk refers to the loss of biological diversity, or the variety of plant and animal life in agricultural landscapes. This map, created in ArcGIS, tries to show where biodiversity could be threatened, such as in areas with significant habitat that coincide with areas of greater agricultural economic activity. Biodiversity is believed to affect the overall health of the environment.

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    This map displays the distribution of organic soils in the agricultural region of Alberta. Organic soils consist of layers of material with greater than 30 percent organic matter and a total thickness of greater than 40 cm. Organic soils are generally saturated with water for most of the year unless drained. Saturation inhibits decomposition and encourages continued accumulation of organic material. Drainage of these soils can result in a rapid increase in decomposition and a reduction in the thickness of the organic material. This resource was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.