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  • This map shows the projected average change in mean temperature (°C) for 2016-2035, with respect to the reference period of 1986-2005 for RCP2.6. The median projected change across the ensemble of CMIP5 climate models is shown. For more maps on projected change, please visit the Canadian Climate Data and Scenarios (CCDS) site: http://ccds-dscc.ec.gc.ca/index.php?page=download-cmip5.

  • This map shows the projected change in mean precipitation for 2016-2035, with respect to the reference period of 1986-2005 for RCP4.5, expressed as a percentage (%) of mean precipitation in the reference period. The median projected change across the ensemble of CMIP5 climate models is shown. For more maps on projected change, please visit the Canadian Climate Data and Scenarios (CCDS) site: http://ccds-dscc.ec.gc.ca/index.php?page=download-cmip5.

  • A database of verified tornado tracks across Canada has been created covering the 30-year period from 1980 to 2009. The tornado data have undergone a number of quality control checks and represent the most current knowledge of past tornado events over the period. However, updates may be made to the database as new or more accurate information becomes available. The data have been converted to a geo-referenced mapping file that can be viewed and manipulated using GIS software.

  • A database of verified tornado tracks across Canada has been created covering the 30-year period from 1980 to 2009. The tornado data have undergone a number of quality control checks and represent the most current knowledge of past tornado events over the period. However, updates may be made to the database as new or more accurate information becomes available. The data have been converted to a geo-referenced mapping file that can be viewed and manipulated using GIS software.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • This map shows the projected average change in mean temperature (°C) for 2081-2100, with respect to the reference period of 1986-2005 for RCP8.5. The median projected change across the ensemble of CMIP5 climate models is shown. For more maps on projected change, please visit the Canadian Climate Data and Scenarios (CCDS) site: http://ccds-dscc.ec.gc.ca/index.php?page=download-cmip5.

  • This map shows the projected change in mean precipitation for 2046-2065, with respect to the reference period of 1986-2005 for RCP8.5, expressed as a percentage (%) of mean precipitation in the reference period. The median projected change across the ensemble of CMIP5 climate models is shown. For more maps on projected change, please visit the Canadian Climate Data and Scenarios (CCDS) site: http://ccds-dscc.ec.gc.ca/index.php?page=download-cmip5.

  • This map shows the projected change in mean precipitation for 2046-2065, with respect to the reference period of 1986-2005 for RCP2.6, expressed as a percentage (%) of mean precipitation in the reference period. The median projected change across the ensemble of CMIP5 climate models is shown. For more maps on projected change, please visit the Canadian Climate Data and Scenarios (CCDS) site: http://ccds-dscc.ec.gc.ca/index.php?page=download-cmip5.