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  • The High Arctic dataset comes from the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). The online tool was decommissioned in 2019 and the data was transferred to Open Data in order to preserve it. The PEMT was originally developed in 2009 to help guide development in the Canadian Arctic by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). The online tool mapped the sensitivities of a variety of Arctic features, ranging from whales to traditional harvesting, across the Arctic. The tool was intended to aid government, oil and gas companies, Aboriginal groups, resource managers and public stakeholders in better understanding the geographic distribution of areas which are sensitive for environmental and socio-economic reasons. The study area is located in the High Arctic Archipelago and contains both marine and terrestrial components. The boundaries of the study area are based on the NOGB leasing grids applied in the High Arctic, under which exploration, significant discovery and production licenses may be issued. The Sverdrup Basin (and Lancaster Sound) has the highest known oil and gas potential of the sedimentary basins of the Arctic Islands (Nunavut Planning Commission 2000) and it is expected that there is oil and gas potential on Melville Island and Bathurst Island (Sivummut Economic Development Strategy Group 2003). To date, no gas has been produced, and 321,470 m³ of oil has been produced from the Bent Horn oil field (Morrell et al. 1995). DISCLAIMER: Please refer to the PEMT Disclaimer document or the Resource Constraints - Use Limitation in the Additional Information section below. Note: This is one of the 3 (three) datasets included in the PEMT application which includes the Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta and Eastern Arctic datasets.

  • The Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta dataset comes from the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). The online tool was decommissioned in 2019 and the data was transferred to Open Data in order to preserve it. The PEMT was originally developed in 2009 to help guide development in the Canadian Arctic by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). The online tool mapped the sensitivities of a variety of Arctic features, ranging from whales to traditional harvesting, across the Arctic. The tool was intended to aid government, oil and gas companies, Aboriginal groups, resource managers and public stakeholders in better understanding the geographic distribution of areas which are sensitive for environmental and socio-economic reasons. The study area and analytical resolution was defined using the oil and gas leasing grid within the Beaufort Sea. The study area has been the scene of oil and gas exploration activity since 1957. Oil was first discovered at Atkinson Point in 1969 and major gas fields in the early 1970s. Such finds spurred the proposal of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline in 1974 and the addition of exploration and investment offshore. Exploration and drilling continued both onshore and offshore until the mid-1970s with the release of the Berger Report, which recommended a 10-year moratorium on the construction of the pipeline. After the release of the Berger Report, the pace of onshore activity declined but offshore exploration escalated in the 1980s. Offshore exploration was facilitated with innovative operating techniques and new offshore platforms that extended the ability to operate in the short open-water season and ice. With the minor exception of the small onshore gas field at Ikhil, no oil or gas has been commercially produced in the area. DISCLAIMER: Please refer to the PEMT Disclaimer document or the Resource Constraints - Use Limitation in the Additional Information section below. Note: This is one of the 3 (three) datasets included in the PEMT application which includes the High Arctic and Eastern Arctic datasets.

  • The dataset contains the extents of mineral leases of Nunavut. A mineral lease is a mineral claim that has been surveyed by a Canada Lands Surveyor. A mineral lease can be applied for after an exploration Prospecting company has done a minimum of representation work in the claim area and if a legal survey on the claim has been recorded. A mineral lease is required for disposal or sale of minerals or of a gross value of more than $100,000 in one year. For more information, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100027889/1100100027890. Note: This is one of the four (4) datasets that describe mineral tenure in Nunavut. It includes mineral claims, mining leases, prospecting permits as well as coal exploration licences.

  • The dataset contains the extents of prospecting permits in Nunavut. A prospecting permit allows prospecting in a large area without competition for a period of three or five years, and gives the holder the exclusive rights to stake a mineral claim within that area. For more information, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100027889/1100100027890. Note: This is one of the four (4) datasets that describe mineral tenure in Nunavut. It includes mineral claims, mining leases, prospecting permits as well as coal exploration licences.

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    The Inuit Communities geographic location dataset contains the geographic location of Inuit Communities in Canada as points, as well as data attributes specific to each community. This dataset is Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC) and Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) official source for Inuit Communities geographic location on maps. For more information, visit https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1100100014187/1534785248701.

  • The Aboriginal Agreements dataset contains the geographic boundaries as well as basic attributes data of arrangements between the government of Canada, provinces and territories, and Aboriginal organizations and communities. These arrangements are of Aboriginal and Northern issues such as education, economic development, child and family services, health, and housing. However, this dataset only contains the Aboriginal Agreements that have a geographic boundary. To view the list of all the Aboriginal Agreements, please visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100014686/1100100014687. The Aboriginal Agreements dataset includes: 1) Self-government agreements which represents the Aboriginal groups that govern their internal affairs and assume greater responsibility and control over the decision making that affects their communities. Self-government agreements which addresses the structure and accountability of Aboriginal governments, their law-making powers, financial arrangements and their responsibilities for providing programs and services to their members. Self-government enables Aboriginal governments to work in partnership with other governments and the private sector to promote economic development and improve social conditions. These boundaries represent the surveyed boundaries of the Aboriginal group’s Indian reserve. 2) Consultation agreements (Consultation protocol) which represents an agreement signed between the Aboriginal group and one or more parties that establish a consultation process. It sets out an orderly process through which the federal and/or provincial governments can consult with an Aboriginal group regarding a contemplated project or activity that may have adverse impacts on established or asserted Aboriginal or Treaty rights. These agreements include Federal Bilateral agreement, Federal Tripartite agreement and Other agreements. These boundaries are usually not surveyed but help to delineate the geographic extent of the agreement. 3) Other agreements is the catch-all category for any remaining geographies of signed agreements between the Aboriginal group and other parties, that do not fit within the aforementioned categories. These boundaries are usually not surveyed but help to delineate the geographic extent of the agreement. The Aboriginal Agreements dataset is part of the Treaties and Aboriginal Agreements geospatial information. The Treaties and Aboriginal Agreements geospatial information represents the geographic boundaries of the solemn agreements between the Crown and the Aboriginal people, and set out promises, obligations and benefits for both parties. The following datasets are also available: 1) The Pre-1975 Treaties (Historic Treaties) dataset represents the large areas of land that the First Nations gave up to the Crown in exchange for such things as reserve lands, benefits or promises. 2) The Post-1975 Treaties (Modern Treaties) dataset represents the areas of Canada where Aboriginal land rights and title have not been addressed by treaty or through other legal means. Data-sharing agreements with the INAC’s internal groups (Negotiations Central and Implementation branch) as well as the Department of Natural Resources Canada are in place to ensure that any update to the attributes data or geography is reflected in the Treaties and Aboriginal Agreements geospatial information. This dataset is Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) primary source for Aboriginal Agreements geographic boundaries on maps. This dataset can also be viewed in the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System (ATRIS). This web-based system provides access to information to inform governments, industry and other interested parties in determining their consultation obligations and in carrying out their consultation research. For more information, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100014686/1100100014687.

  • The dataset contains polygon areas that represent the locations of coal exploration licences granted in Nunavut. For more information, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100027889/1100100027890. Note: This is one of the four (4) datasets that describe mineral tenure in Nunavut. It includes mineral claims, mining leases, prospecting permits as well as coal exploration licences.

  • The Eastern Arctic dataset comes from the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). The online tool was decommissioned in 2019 and the data was transferred to Open Data in order to preserve it. The PEMT was originally developed in 2009 to help guide development in the Canadian Arctic by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). The online tool mapped the sensitivities of a variety of Arctic features, ranging from whales to traditional harvesting, across the Arctic. The tool was intended to aid government, oil and gas companies, Aboriginal groups, resource managers and public stakeholders in better understanding the geographic distribution of areas which are sensitive for environmental and socio-economic reasons. The study area is located east of Baffin Island, Nunavut and encompasses marine habitat in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. The boundaries of the study area are based on NOGB leasing grids applied in the Eastern Arctic, under which exploration and production licenses may be issued. Although portions of the study area hold high oil and gas potential and several small oil fields and substantial reserves of gas have been found since the 1960s in the north Baffin region, exploration for oil and gas has been limited to seismic operations and geological field work. DISCLAIMER: Please refer to the PEMT Disclaimer document or the Resource Constraints - Use Limitation in the Additional Information section below. Note: This is one of the 3 (three) datasets included in the PEMT application which includes the Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta and High Arctic datasets.

  • The Pre-1975 Treaties (Historic Treaties) dataset contains the geographic boundaries as well as basic attributes data of all signed agreements that were negotiated between 1725 and 1929. However, the Anglo-Huron Treaty (Murray Treaty), which is part of the Treaties of Peace and Neutrality, is not represented in this dataset because it has no geographic boundary. These boundaries represent the large areas of land that the First Nations gave up to the Crown in exchange for such things as reserve lands, benefits or promises. These boundaries are usually not surveyed but help to delineate the broad area defined within the treaty. The boundaries are composed of the sum of specific geographies such as lakes, rivers, townships, mountains, administrative boundaries or height of land as mentioned in the treaties transcript. These boundaries are estimated based on written descriptions and should be used for informational and representational purposes only. The various treaties created between the Crown and the Aboriginal people, include: the Treaties of Peace and Neutrality, the Peace and Friendship Treaties, Upper Canada Land Surrenders, the Williams Treaties, the Robinson Treaties, the Douglas Treaties and the Numbered Treaties. For more information about Pre-1975 Treaties, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1370362690208/1370362747827. The Pre-1975 Treaties dataset is part of the Treaties and Aboriginal Agreements geospatial information. The Treaties and Aboriginal Agreements geospatial information represent the geographic boundaries of the solemn agreements between the Crown and the Aboriginal people, and set out promises, obligations and benefits for both parties. The following datasets are also available: 1) The Post-1975 Treaties (Modern Treaties) dataset represents the areas of Canada where Aboriginal land rights and title have not been addressed by treaty or through other legal means. 2) The Aboriginal Agreements dataset represents established consultation processes and the Aboriginal groups that govern their internal affairs and assume greater responsibility and control over the decision making that affects their communities. Data-sharing agreements with the INAC’s internal groups (Negotiations Central and Implementation branch) as well as the Department of Natural Resources Canada are in place to ensure that any update to the attributes data or geography is reflected in the Treaties and Aboriginal Agreements geospatial information. This dataset is Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) primary source for Pre-1975 Treaties geographic boundaries on maps. This dataset can also be viewed in the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System (ATRIS). This web-based system provides access to information to inform governments, industry and other interested parties in determining their consultation obligations and in carrying out their consultation research. For more information, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100014686/1100100014687.

  • The dataset contains the extents of mineral claims of Nunavut. A mineral claim is an area of Crown Land that is staked out by an individual or Mineral Exploration Company that holds a valid Prospectors license. This grants the individual or mineral exploration company the mineral rights to the staked out piece of land as provided for under the Nunavut Mining Regulations, SOR/214-69. If the holder of a mineral claim wishes to produce minerals from the claim, or to hold it for more than ten years, the holder must apply for a lease of the claim. This digital coverage provides a record and tracking mechanism for mining exploration in Nunavut. For more information, visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100027889/1100100027890. Note: This is one of the four (4) datasets that describe mineral tenure in Nunavut. It includes mineral claims, mining leases, prospecting permits as well as coal exploration licences.