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    In 2018, Fisheries and Oceans Canada initiated the Multidisciplinary Arctic Program (MAP) – Last Ice, the first ecosystem study of the poorly characterized region of the Lincoln Sea in the Marine Protected Area of Tuvaijuittuq, where multiyear ice still resides in the Arctic Ocean. MAP-Last Ice takes a coordinated approach to integrate the physical, biochemical, and ecological components of the sea ice-ocean connected ecosystem and its response to climate and ocean forcings. The cross-disciplinary program establishes baseline ecological knowledge for Tuvaijuittuq and, in particular, for its unique multiyear ice ecosystem. The database provides baseline data on the abundance of bacteria and viruses in multi- and first-year ice and in surface waters of the Lincoln Sea in Tuvaijuittuq, and their relation to bio-physical conditions. The data were collected during the 2018 spring field campaign of the MAP-Last Ice Program, at an ice camp offshore of Canadian Forces Station (CFS) Alert.

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    Monitoring data from DFO invasive species monitoring programs, along with occurrence information from online databases and the scientific literature, have been paired with high resolution environmental data and oceanographic models in species distribution models that predict present-day and project future distributions of 24 non-indigenous species (NIS) on North America`s east coast, and 31 NIS on its west coast. Future distributions were predicted for 2100, under Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s fifth Assessment Report. Present-day and future richness of these species (i.e., hotspots) have been estimated by summing the occurrence probabilities of NIS. This data set includes the present-day and year 2100 species distribution modeling results for each species, and the estimated species richness. Cite this data as: Lyons DA., Lowen JB, Therriault TW., Brickman D., Guo L., Moore AM., Peña MA., Wang Z., DiBacco C. Data of: Updated species distribution models for marine invasive species hotspot identification. Published: November 2023. Coastal Ecosystems Science Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, N.S. https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/1439dcb3-82a6-40fd-a9a4-8f045b20ff5b

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    Data layers show commercial fishery footprints for directed fisheries using bottom and pelagic longlines for groundfish and large pelagics respectively, and traps for hagfish, LFA 41 and Grey Zone lobster, snow crab, and other crab on the Scotian Shelf, the Bay of Fundy, and Georges Bank in NAFO Divisions 4VWX and Canadian portions of 5Y and 5Z. Bottom longline and trap fishery maps aggregate commercial logbook effort (bottom longline soak time and logbook entries) per 2-minute grid cell using 2002–2017 data. Pelagic longline maps aggregate speed-filtered vessel monitoring system (VMS) track lines as vessel minutes per km2 on a base-10 log scale using 2003–2018 data. The following data layers are included in the mapping service for use in marine spatial planning and ecological risk assessment: 1) multi-year and quarterly composite data layers for bottom longline and trap gear, and 2) multi-year and monthly composite data layers for pelagic longline gear. Additional details are available online: S. Butler, D. Ibarra and S. Coffen-Smout, 2019. Maritimes Region Longline and Trap Fisheries Footprint Mapping for Marine Spatial Planning and Risk Assessment. Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 3293: v + 30 p. http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2019/mpo-dfo/Fs97-6-3293-eng.pdf

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    The data layer (.tif) presented are the results of using MaxEnt to produce a single species habitat map for Sea Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) on German Bank (off South West Nova Scotia, Canada). Presence data derived from videos and still images were compared against environmental variables derived from multibeam bathymetry (Slope, Curvature, Aspect and Bathymetric Position Index (BPI)), and backscatter data (principal components: Q1, Q2, and Q3). Results represent a probability of habitat suitability for Sea Scallop on German Bank. Probability of suitability: The probability that a given habitat is suitable for a species based on presence data and underlying environmental variables (i.e. probability of species occurrence). Reference: Brown, C. J., Sameoto, J. A., & Smith, S. J. (2012). Multiple methods, maps, and management applications: Purpose made seafloor maps in support of ocean management. Journal of Sea Research, 72, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.seares.2012.04.009 Cite this data as: Brown, C. J., Sameoto, J. A., & Smith, S. J. Data of: Distribution of Sea Scallop on German Bank. Published: February 2021. Population Ecology Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, N.S. https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/2bb98a09-5daf-42c4-94e8-e5de718b821d

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    In 2018, Fisheries and Oceans Canada initiated the Multidisciplinary Arctic Program (MAP) – Last Ice, the first ecosystem study of the poorly characterized region of Tuvaijuittuq, where multiyear ice still resides in the Arctic Ocean. The program MAP-Last Ice takes a coordinated approach to integrate the physical, biochemical, and ecological components of the sea ice-ocean connected ecosystem and its response to climate and ocean forcings. This program provides baseline ecological knowledge for Tuvaijuittuq and, in particular, for its unique multiyear ice ecosystem. The database provides baseline data on fatty acid composition and stable isotopes signatures of sea ice communities in multi- and first-year ice in Tuvaijuittuq. The data were collected during the 2018 spring field campaign of the MAP-Last Ice Program, offshore of Canadian Forces Station (CFS) Alert, in the Lincoln Sea.

  • Concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope. Large ball-shaped Geodia spp. sponges were located along the continental slopes north of the Grand Banks, while on the Scotian Shelf a unique population of the large barrel-shaped sponge Vazella pourtalesi was identified. The latitude and longitude marking the positions of all tows which form these and other dense aggregations are provided along with the positions of all tows which captured black coral, a non-aggregating taxon which is long-lived and vulnerable to fishing pressures.

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    Speckled Dace (Rhinichthys osculus) are listed under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) as endangered. These fresh water fish, of the family Cyprinidae, are found in Canada only in the Kettle Valley of British Columbia. Proposed critical habitat was based on minimum viable population analysis and assumed densities of fish. From October 19th to the 22nd of 2015, night time pole seining surveys were conducted to enumerate Speckled Dace in proposed critical habitat on the West Kettle River; one of three rivers containing Speckled Dace. The estimated population abundance of Speckled Dace within the survey area was 8,978 (6,143-11,814), however only 1,014 of these are estimated to be adults.

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    Fish Habitat Assessment Output: 5 of 16 High Water Level (75.4m ASL) - Juvenile/Adult Habitat - High Vegetation Association Species (All Thermal Guilds) Habitat suitability was assessed for the Bay of Quinte Area of Concern, at a 3 m grid resolution, using the Habitat Ecosystem Assessment Tool (HEAT), temperature algorithms, vegetation models, and water level input. Habitat classifications were based on three variables: depth (elevation), vegetation, and substrate; and modified by temperature suitabilities. The final suitability maps were based on documented habitat and temperature associations for the fish in the area. Different life stages (spawning requirements, nursery habitat, adult habitat) were modeled for the years of 1972-2011. Suitability values were scaled from 0 (not suitable) to 1 (highly suitable) and converted to suitability classes of very low, low, medium, and high. The final maps for each guild – life stage combination are maximum suitability values from the 39-year period modelled.

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    This dataset contains digital data files on transects flown and reported in Harwood, L.A. and P. Norton (1996). Aerial survey data from the southeast Beaufort Sea, Mackenzie River estuary and west. Amundsen Gulf, July 1992. Canadian Data Report of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences No. 964

  • Habitat suitability was assessed for the Bay of Quinte Area of Concern, at a 3 m grid resolution, using the Habitat Ecosystem Assessment Tool (HEAT), temperature algorithms, vegetation models, and water level input. Habitat classifications were based on three variables: depth (elevation), vegetation, and substrate; and modified by temperature suitabilities. The final suitability maps were based on documented habitat and temperature associations for the fish in the area. Different life stages (spawning requirements, nursery habitat, adult habitat) were modeled for the years of 1972-2011. Suitability values were scaled from 0 (not suitable) to 1 (highly suitable) and converted to suitability classes of very low, low, medium, and high. The final maps for each guild – life stage combination are maximum suitability values from the 39-year period modelled.