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    As part of the Musquash Marine Protected Area (MPA) Monitoring Plan, this project was implemented to establish a baseline for infaunal biodiversity for this area. Data collection began in 2010 and contributed monitoring information for productivity, biodiversity, and habitat indicators within the Musquash Harbour. A 1500 cubic centimetre ponar benthic grab was deployed at 30 random stations distributed over three strata (channel, intertidal and subtidal). Samples were to be collected up to three times per year to account for seasonality and annual variation. Once collected the benthic samples were analyzed for changes in grain size, carbon content (Loss on ignition), species abundance/diversity and biomass. Cite this data as: Cooper, J.A., and Blanchard, M. Musquash Benthic Infauna. Published in September 2023. Coastal Ecosystem Science Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews, NB. For additional information please see: Cooper, A., Abbott, M., Allard, K., Chang,, B., Courtenay, S., Doherty, P., Greenlaw, M., Ipsen, E., Koropatnick, T., Law, B., Losier, R., Martin, J., Methven, D., and Page, F. 2014. Musquash Estuary Marine Protected Area (MPA): Data Assessment. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2014/001. v + 57 p. Cooper, J.A., Jones, O. and Blanchard, M. 2023. Review of Baseline Monitoring within the Musquash Estuary Marine Protected Area. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2023/028. viii + 56 p. Oceans and Coastal Management Division (OCMD). 2015. Musquash Estuary Marine Protected Area Ecosystem Monitoring Plan (2014-2019). Can. Manuscr. Rep. Fish Aquat. Sci. 3077: v+17 pp. DFO. 2022. 2021 Review of Musquash Marine Protected Area Monitoring. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Sci. Advis. Rep. 2022/016.

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    Between 2001 and 2004 a descriptive and comparative investigation of the benthic macro-infauna in 17 pockmarks and 10 reference locations outside pockmarks in Passamaquoddy Bay-Bay of Fundy- was made. This dataset contains the locations of the grab samples for each pockmark in the study area, the taxon abundance identified in each sample and the georeferenced video transect from 2004 using a towcam- an underwater, bottom referencing vehicle on which floodlights, analogue video- and digital still-camera were mounted. For more information of the data: Wildish DJ, Akagi HM, McKeown DL, Pohle GW (2008) Pockmarks influence benthic communities in Passamaquoddy Bay, Bay of Fundy, Canada. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 357:51-66. https://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v357/p51-66/

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    This dataset includes metrics of seagrass productivity and resilience collected from field sites along the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia, Canada. Field sites were located across a gradient of temperature and light conditions. Sampling was conducted monthly from May 2018 to July 2019. Seagrass density and plants were sampled at 10 haphazardly distributed sampling stations within each seagrass bed at approximately the same depth. Stations were ~10m apart and at least 2m from any seagrass-bare interface. Quadrats were used to determine vegetative and reproductive shoot density, and hand corers to collect seagrass above and belowground biomass. Three plants from each sampling station were also collected and processed in the laboratory for length and width leaf 3, number leaves per shoot, rhizome width, and rhizome water soluble carbohydrates. Also included in this data set are time-series records of bottom temperature at each site measured in 15-mins intervals using HOBO TidbiTv2 loggers.

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    Funded under DFO's Marine Conservation Targets Program, this optical imagery benthic survey documents the occurrence and estimated percent cover of the invasive colonial tunicate, Didemnum vexillum in seven drift-camera transects in the 'Head Harbour/West Isles Archipelago/The Passages' Ecologically and Biologically Significant Area (ESBA, ~113km2) in the western Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. Occurrence data was derived from the use of high-resolution still images (n=386) taken periodically throughout each transect, and simultaneous continuous high-definition video. Video was divided into 20-second segments (here, we report the start and end location of each segment within a transect) and when D. vexillum was present in a video segment, frequency of occurrence was classified as common (continuous coverage/patches throughout the video segment), occasional (individual colonies of various sizes encountered >5 times throughout the video segment), or rare (small, isolated colonies encountered ≤5 times throughout the video segment). A video segment was deemed unusable and removed from the dataset if there was too much turbidity, or if the camera position was too high off-bottom to reliably image the seafloor. For still images, when D. vexillum was observed in an image, colony percent cover was categorized as >50%, 26-50%, 6-25%, or ≤5% of the images field of view (FOV). Distance travelled and distance between still images (m) was calculated using ArcGIS tools. FOV was estimated by measuring the length and width of a subset of still images and video frame grabs in ImageJ2, using 10-cm lasers for scale. FOV was standardized for each reported altitude, and area sampled (m2) along a continuous video segment was estimated by multiplying the average FOV by the distance travelled in that segment. D. vexillum was found in 44% of the area sampled at depths from 34 to 118m, deeper than previous reports globally of ~80m.

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    The Coastal Environmental Baseline Program is a multi-year Fisheries and Oceans Canada initiative designed to work with Indigenous and local communities and other key parties to collect coastal environmental data at six unique sites across Canada, including the Port of Saint John (New Brunswick). The overall purpose of the Program is to collect localized ecological data in these areas to build a better baseline understanding of marine ecological conditions. The Maritimes region has developed a physical oceanography project to align with the interests and data needs of local communities and stakeholders. Starting in 2020, data describing the depth and temperature of tidal flood waters have been collected at a series of intertidal locations in the Port of Saint John vicinity, to characterize high marsh flood tides and water level fluctuations near the Courtenay Bay causeway. Inundation by marine waters in high marsh areas is typically limited to spring tides, while the water level in Courtenay Bay is influenced by anthropogenic infrastructure (e.g. causeway, tide gates). The resulting data can enhance studies ranging from coastal vulnerability and resilience to salt marsh morphodynamics, by quantifying the frequency, amplitude and duration of tidal inundation. Data were collected using Hobo U20-001-02 water level loggers, which were deployed inside stilling wells constructed from 15-inch lengths of perforated ABS pipe (2¼” diameter). The stilling wells were sunk to a depth of 6 inches below ground, with the water level logger suspended inside the well from a bolt near the top. The logger was positioned with a rigid wire such that the measurement volume was equal to ground level, while allowing the logger to be easily removed for downloading and precisely replaced at the measurement location. Loggers were accessed 2-3 times per year to download, and were removed during the winter months. Data have been compensated for changing atmospheric pressure using the Barometric Compensation Tool in HobowarePro (version 3.7.21) and barometric pressure data collected from a dry location during the study period. The resulting water level is reported in meters, and is relative to the elevation of the water level logger (e.g. above ground level). Citation: Port of Saint John intertidal water level and temperature (2020-2022). Coastal Environmental Baseline Program. Coastal Ecosystems Science Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews, N.B. XX-XX-2024

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    A derivative of DFO’s benthic species survey for the Strategic Program for Ecosystem-based Research and Advice (SPERA) (open data record ID: e736c0f0-b19e-4842-903d-28bfc756d48a), this benthic survey funded through the Canadian Healthy Oceans Network (CHONeII) looks at the presence/absence and abundance of two biogenic habitat-forming species that are listed as vulnerable to disturbance in a subset of 50 drift camera transects in the ‘Head Harbour/West Isles Archipelago/The Passages’ Ecologically and Biologically Significant Area (EBSA) in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada (~113km2). Presence/absence and abundance data of the stalked sea squirt (Boltenia ovifera) and horse mussel (Modiolus modiolus) were derived from the use of high-resolution Nikon D800 36.1 megapixel still images (n=2576, see link to parent record for more descriptive survey information) to be used in species distribution modelling. Image field of view (FOV) was estimated using a 10 cm-wide trigger weight for scale,and standardized across images using the average FOV estimate (0.75 x 0.5 m) across a subset of 200 images. Species counts were then converted to abundance estimates (number of individuals per square-meter) by dividing counts by 0.375m2. Boltenia ovifera was observed at densities reaching 456 ind./m2, while Modiolus modiolus density reached a maximum of 240 ind./m2. Cite this data as: Mireault C.A., Lawton P., Devillers R. and Teed L. Presence/absence and abundance of vulnerable marine ecosystem species Boltenia ovifera and Modiolus modiolus in the lower Bay of Fundy derived from high resolution still imagery. Published September 2023. Coastal Ecosystems Science Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews, N.B. https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/152ae3f1-d2b9-43d9-a7b4-d769d9e9fc41