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    The hydrographic features of the CanVec series include watercourses, water linear flow segments, hydrographic obstacles (falls, rapids, etc.), waterbodies (lakes, watercourses, etc.), permanent snow and ice features, water wells and springs. The Hydrographic features theme provides quality vector geospatial data (current, accurate, and consistent) of Canadian hydrographic phenomena. It aims to offer a geometric description and a set of basic attributes on hydrographic features that comply with international geomatics standards, seamlessly across Canada. The CanVec multiscale series is available as prepackaged downloadable files and by user-defined extent via a Geospatial data extraction tool. Related Products: [Topographic Data of Canada - CanVec Series](https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/8ba2aa2a-7bb9-4448-b4d7-f164409fe056)

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    This collection is a legacy product that is no longer supported. It may not meet current Government standards. The National Topographic Data Base (NTDB) comprises digital vector data sets that cover the entire Canadian landmass. The NTDB includes features such as watercourses, urban areas, railways, roads, vegetation, and relief. The organizational unit for the NTDB is the National Topographic System (NTS), based on the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83). Each file (data set) consists of one NTS unit at either the 1:50,000 or 1:250,000 scale. Related Products: [NTDB Correction Matrices, 2003-2009](https://ouvert.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/b6d0c19c-27e3-4392-b21f-49b1eec95653)

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    This collection is a legacy product that is no longer maintained. It may not meet current government standards. Users of Atlas of Canada National Scale Data 1:5,000,000 (release of May 2017) should plan to make the transition towards the new CanVec product. The Atlas of Canada National Scale Data 1:5,000,000 Series consists of boundary, coast, island, place name, railway, river, road, road ferry and waterbody data sets that were compiled to be used for atlas medium scale (1:5,000,000 to 1:15,000,000) mapping. These data sets have been integrated so that their relative positions are cartographically correct. Any data outside of Canada included in the data sets is strictly to complete the context of the data.

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    This collection is a legacy product that is no longer supported. It may not meet current government standards. Canada's Orthoimages 2005-2010 is the national medium-resolution imagery coverage of Canada. These digital raster data acquired by the Spot4 and Spot5 satellites comprise five spectral bands, namely: a panchromatic band having 10 m pixels and four multispectral bands having pixels of 20 m. These orthoimages were produced according to the 1983 North American Reference System (NAD83SCRS) according to the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) and Lambert Conformal Conic (LCC) mapping. The set of orthoimages was created with the most accurate control data available at the time of its creation: Landsat7 Imagery Control Points, National Road Network (NRN) ) and the Landsat7 Orthorectified Imagery.

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    This collection is a legacy product that is no longer supported. It may not meet current government standards. The Canadian Digital Elevation Model (CDEM) is part of Natural Resources Canada's altimetry system designed to better meet the users' needs for elevation data and products. The CDEM stems from the existing Canadian Digital Elevation Data (CDED). In these data, elevations can be either ground or reflective surface elevations. A CDEM mosaic can be obtained for a pre-defined or user-defined extent. The coverage and resolution of a mosaic varies according to latitude and to the extent of the requested area. Derived products such as slope, shaded relief and colour shaded relief maps can also be generated on demand by using the Geospatial-Data Extraction tool. Data can then be saved in many formats. The pre-packaged GeoTiff datasets are based on the National Topographic System of Canada (NTS) at the 1:250 000 scale; the NTS index file is available in the Resources section in many formats.

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    A population ecumene is the area of inhabited lands or settled areas generally delimited by a minimum population density. This ecumene shows the areas of the densest and most extended population within census divisions. Census divisions are the provincially legislated areas (such as county, municipalité régionale de comté, and regional district) or their equivalents. Census divisions are intermediate geographic areas between the province or territory level and the municipality (census subdivision). For further information, consult the Statistics Canada’s 2016 Illustrated Glossary (see below under Data Resources). The assemblage of dissemination area population density data from the 2016 Census of Population are used to form the ecumene within census divisions. Areas included in the ecumene are dissemination areas where the population density is greater than or equal to 0.4 persons per square kilometre or about one person per square mile. In some areas to capture more population within the ecumene the criteria was extended to 0.2 persons per square kilometre. The ecumene areas were generalized in certain areas to enhance the size of some isolated ecumene areas in northern Canada. This map can be used as an “ecumene” overlay to differentiate the sparsely populated areas from the ecumene in conjunction with census division data or other small-scale maps. This ecumene shows a more meaningful distribution of the population for Canada.

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    Canada is divided into 338 electoral districts. A representative or member of Parliament is elected for each electoral district. Following the release of population counts from each decennial census, the Chief Electoral Officer determines the number of seats in the House of Commons and publishes the information in the Canada Gazette. Electoral boundaries commissions then determine the adjustments to the constituency boundaries. The federal electoral boundaries commissions are independent bodies that make all decisions regarding the proposed and final federal electoral boundaries. Elections Canada provides support services to the boundaries commission in each province. Based on reports from these commissions, the Chief Electoral Officer prepares a representation order that describes the boundaries and specifies the name and the population of each FED. The representation order is in force on the first dissolution of Parliament that occurs at least seven months after its proclamation. The 2013 Representation Order (proclaimed on October 5, 2013) was based on 2011 Census population counts, and increased the number of FEDs to 338, up from 308 from the previous 2003 Representation Order. Ontario received fifteen additional seats, Alberta and British Columbia each gained six seats while Quebec added three seats. On June 19, 2014, the Riding Name Change Act, 2014 (Bill C-37) received Royal Assent changing the names of 31 FEDs. The names of FEDs may change at any time through an Act of Parliament.

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    The resource management features of the CanVec series include power lines, communication lines, pipelines, valves, petroleum wells, wind-operated devices, transformer stations, ore extraction sites, aggregate extraction sites, peat extraction sites and oil and gas sites. The CanVec multiscale series is available as prepackaged downloadable files and by user-defined extent via a Geospatial data extraction tool. Related Products: [Topographic Data of Canada - CanVec Series](https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/8ba2aa2a-7bb9-4448-b4d7-f164409fe056)

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    The digital Polling Division boundary files provided are made available from Elections Canada. The data contains the digital federal electoral districts under the Representation Order of 2013.

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    This interactive map is a collaborative project by the Geographical Names Board of Canada, illustrating a curated selection of places in Canada with names that have origins in multiple Indigenous languages. The names selected show the history and evolution of Indigenous place naming in Canada, from derived and inaccurate usage, to names provided by Indigenous organisations. Many Indigenous place names convey stories, knowledge, and descriptions of the land. By celebrating these names through this map, the Geographical Names Board of Canada hopes to increase the awareness of existing Indigenous place names and help promote the revitalization of Indigenous cultures and languages. Many more Indigenous place names exist in Canada and will be added in future releases of this map. The content of this map is a compilation of information obtained from many current and historical sources. The Geographical Names Board of Canada does not warrant or guarantee that the information is accurate, complete or current at all times. For more information, to report data errors, or to suggest improvements to this application, please contact the Geographical Names Board of Canada Secretariat.