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  • 'Province' and 'territory' refer to the major political units of Canada. From a statistical point of view, province and territory are basic areas for which data are tabulated. Canada is divided into 10 provinces and 3 territories. Statistics Canada uses standard codes and abbreviations to represent provinces and territories. The two-digit code that uniquely identifies each province/territory is based on the Standard Geographical Classification (SGC). The code is assigned from east to west. The first digit represents the geographical region of Canada in which the province/territory is located and the second digit denotes one of the 10 provinces and 3 territories.

  • Group of neighbouring municipalities joined together for the purposes of regional planning and managing common services (such as police or ambulance services). These groupings are established under laws in effect in certain provinces of Canada. Census division (CD) is the general term for provincially legislated areas (such as county, municipalité régionale de comté and regional district) or their equivalents. In other provinces and the territories where laws do not provide for such areas, Statistics Canada defines equivalent areas for statistical reporting purposes in cooperation with these provinces and territories. Census divisions are intermediate geographic areas between the province/territory level and the municipality (census subdivision). Census divisions (CD) have been established in provincial law to facilitate regional planning, as well as the provision of services that can be more effectively delivered on a scale larger than a municipality. In Newfoundland and Labrador, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, provincial or territorial law does not provide for these administrative geographic areas. Therefore, Statistics Canada, in cooperation with these provinces and territories, has created equivalent areas called CDs for the purpose of disseminating statistical data. In Yukon, the CD is equivalent to the entire territory. Next to provinces and territories, census divisions (CD) are the most stable administrative geographic areas, and are therefore often used in longitudinal analysis.

  • This service shows the median household after-tax income in 2015 for Canada, by 2016 census subdivision. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. After-tax income - refers to total income less income taxes of the statistical unit during a specified reference period (for additional information refer to Total Income – 2016 Census Dictionary and After-tax Income – 2016 Census Dictionary). The median income of a specified group is the amount that divides the income distribution of that group into two halves. Census subdivision (CSD) is the general term for municipalities (as determined by provincial/territorial legislation) or areas treated as municipal equivalents for statistical purposes (e.g., Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories). Municipal status is defined by laws in effect in each province and territory in Canada. To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census subdivision” web service, accessible in the data resources section below. Besides the variable described here, the dataset contains the id, name, type, province, population, land area and the number of private households for each census subdivision. If a value is null, it could be because it is not available for a specific reference period, it is not applicable, it is too unreliable to be published or it is suppressed to meet confidentiality requirements of the Statistics Act. To find out the exact reason, refer to the source data from Census in the resources below.

  • This service shows the median household after-tax income in 2015 for Canada, by 2016 census division. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. After-tax income - refers to total income less income taxes of the statistical unit during a specified reference period (for additional information refer to Total Income – 2016 Census Dictionary and After-tax Income – 2016 Census Dictionary). The median income of a specified group is the amount that divides the income distribution of that group into two halves. Census division (CD) is the general term for provincially legislated areas (such as county, municipalité régionale de comté and regional district) or their equivalents. In other provinces and the territories where laws do not provide for such areas, Statistics Canada defines equivalent areas for statistical reporting purposes in cooperation with these provinces and territories. Census divisions are intermediate geographic areas between the province/territory level and the municipality (census subdivision). To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census division” web service, accessible in the data resources section below. Besides the variable described here, the dataset contains the id, name, type, province, population, land area and the number of private households for each census division.

  • Census subdivision (CSD) is the general term for municipalities (as determined by provincial/territorial legislation) or areas treated as municipal equivalents for statistical purposes (e.g., Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories). Municipal status is defined by laws in effect in each province and territory in Canada. Census subdivisions (CSDs) are classified into 53 types according to official designations adopted by provincial/territorial or federal authorities. Two exceptions are 'subdivision of unorganized' (SNO) in Newfoundland and Labrador, and 'subdivision of county municipality' (SC) in Nova Scotia, which are geographic areas created as equivalents for municipalities by Statistics Canada, in cooperation with those provinces, for the purpose of disseminating statistical data. The census subdivision type accompanies the census subdivision name in order to distinguish CSDs from each other, for example, Balmoral, VL (for the village of Balmoral) and Balmoral, P (for the parish / paroisse (municipalité de) of Balmoral).

  • This web mapping service provides spatial reference context with an emphasis on transportation networks. It is designed especially for use as a background map in a web mapping application or geographic information system (GIS). The CBMT is available as a dynamic service(WMS) or a tiled service (ESRI REST and WMTS).

  • This service shows the proportion of average total income of households which is spent on shelter costs by census division. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. Shelter-cost-to-income ratio is calculated for private households living in owned or rented dwellings who reported a total household income greater than zero. Private households living in band housing, located on an agricultural operation that is operated by a member of the household, and households who reported a zero or negative total household income are excluded. The relatively high shelter-costs-to-household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter costs and household total income data. The reference period for shelter cost data is 2016, while household total income is reported for the year 2015. As well, for some households, the 2015 household total income may represent income for only part of a year. For additional information refer to the 2016 Census Dictionary for 'Total income' and 'Shelter cost'. To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census division” web service, accessible in the data resources section below.

  • This service shows the median total income of households in 2015 for Canada by 2016 census subdivision. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. Total income refers to the sum of certain incomes (in cash and, in some circumstances, in kind) of the statistical unit during a specified reference period. The median income of a specified group is the amount that divides the income distribution of that group into two halves. For additional information refer to 'Total income' in the 2016 Census Dictionary. For additional information refer to 'Total income' in the 2016 Census Dictionary. To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census subdivision” web service, accessible in the data resources section below.

  • This service shows the median total income of households in 2015 for Canada by 2016 census division.The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. Total income refers to the sum of certain incomes (in cash and, in some circumstances, in kind) of the statistical unit during a specified reference period. The median income of a specified group is the amount that divides the income distribution of that group into two halves. For additional information refer to 'Total income' in the 2016 Census Dictionary. For additional information refer to 'Total income' in the 2016 Census Dictionary. To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census division” web service, accessible in the data resources section below.

  • This service shows the percentage of population aged 25 to 64 years in private households with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree by census subdivision, 2016. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. This data pertains to the population aged 25 to 64 years in private households by the highest level of education that a person has successfully completed. Persons with a post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree includes those with an apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma; a college, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma; a university certificate or diploma below bachelor level or a university certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor level or above. For additional information refer to the 2016 Census Dictionary for ' Highest certificate, diploma or degree'. For additional information refer to the 2016 Census Dictionary for ' Highest certificate, diploma or degree'. To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census subdivision” web service, accessible in the data resources section below.