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Earth Sciences

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  • This web mapping service provides spatial reference context with an emphasis on transportation networks. It is designed especially for use as a background map in a web mapping application or geographic information system (GIS). The CBMT is available as a dynamic service(WMS) or a tiled service (ESRI REST and WMTS).

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    Canada is divided into 308 electoral districts. A representative or member of Parliament is elected for each electoral district. Following the release of population counts from each decennial census, the Chief Electoral Officer determines the number of seats in the House of Commons and publishes the information in the Canada Gazette. Electoral boundaries commissions then determine the adjustments to the constituency boundaries. The federal electoral boundaries commissions are independent bodies that make all decisions regarding the proposed and final federal electoral boundaries. Elections Canada provides support services to the boundaries commission in each province. Based on reports from these commissions, the Chief Electoral Officer prepares a representation order that describes the boundaries and specifies the name and the population of each FED. The representation order is in force on the first dissolution of Parliament that occurs at least one year after its proclamation. The 2003 Representation Order (proclaimed on August 25, 2003) was based on 2001 Census population counts, and increased the number of FEDs to 308, up from 301 from the previous 1996 Representation Order. Ontario received three additional seats, while Alberta and British Columbia each gained two seats. The names of FEDs may change at any time through an Act of Parliament.

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    Canada is divided into 338 electoral districts. A representative or member of Parliament is elected for each electoral district. Following the release of population counts from each decennial census, the Chief Electoral Officer determines the number of seats in the House of Commons and publishes the information in the Canada Gazette. Electoral boundaries commissions then determine the adjustments to the constituency boundaries. The federal electoral boundaries commissions are independent bodies that make all decisions regarding the proposed and final federal electoral boundaries. Elections Canada provides support services to the boundaries commission in each province. Based on reports from these commissions, the Chief Electoral Officer prepares a representation order that describes the boundaries and specifies the name and the population of each FED. The representation order is in force on the first dissolution of Parliament that occurs at least seven months after its proclamation. The 2013 Representation Order (proclaimed on October 5, 2013) was based on 2011 Census population counts, and increased the number of FEDs to 338, up from 308 from the previous 2003 Representation Order. Ontario received fifteen additional seats, Alberta and British Columbia each gained six seats while Quebec added three seats. On June 19, 2014, the Riding Name Change Act, 2014 (Bill C-37) received Royal Assent changing the names of 31 FEDs. The names of FEDs may change at any time through an Act of Parliament.

  • The toponymic features of the CanVec series include proper nouns designating places and representations of the territory. This data come from provincial, territorial and Canadian toponymic databases. They are used in the CanVec Series for cartographic reference purposes and vary according to the scale of display. The toponymic features of the CanVec series can differ from the Canada's official geographical names. The CanVec multiscale series is available as prepackaged downloadable files and by user-defined extent via a Geospatial data extraction tool. Related Products: [Topographic Data of Canada - CanVec Series](https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/8ba2aa2a-7bb9-4448-b4d7-f164409fe056) Users can obtain information about Canada's official toponyms at: **[Geographical names in Canada](https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/maps-tools-publications/maps/geographical-names-canada/10786)**

  • Canada is divided into 308 electoral districts. A representative or member of Parliament is elected for each electoral district. Following the release of population counts from each decennial census, the Chief Electoral Officer determines the number of seats in the House of Commons and publishes the information in the Canada Gazette. Electoral boundaries commissions then determine the adjustments to the constituency boundaries. The federal electoral boundaries commissions are independent bodies that make all decisions regarding the proposed and final federal electoral boundaries. Elections Canada provides support services to the boundaries commission in each province. Based on reports from these commissions, the Chief Electoral Officer prepares a representation order that describes the boundaries and specifies the name and the population of each FED. The representation order is in force on the first dissolution of Parliament that occurs at least one year after its proclamation. The 2003 Representation Order (proclaimed on August 25, 2003) was based on 2001 Census population counts, and increased the number of FEDs to 308, up from 301 from the previous 1996 Representation Order. Ontario received three additional seats, while Alberta and British Columbia each gained two seats. The names of FEDs may change at any time through an Act of Parliament.

  • The Canadian Geographical Names Data Base (CGNDB) is the authoritative national database of Canada's geographical names. The purpose of the CGNDB is to store place names and their attributes that have been approved by the Geographical Names Board of Canada (GNBC), the national coordinating body responsible for standards and policies on place names. The CGNDB is maintained by Natural Resources Canada, through the Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation. The geographic extent of the CGNDB is the Canadian landmass and water bodies; the temporal extent is from 1897 to present. This dataset is extracted from the CGNDB on a weekly basis, and consists of current officially approved names, feature type, coordinates of the feature, decision date, source, and other attributes. The output file formats for this product are: text (CSV), Shape (SHP), and Keyhole Markup Language (KML).

  • Canada is divided into 338 electoral districts. A representative or member of Parliament is elected for each electoral district. Following the release of population counts from each decennial census, the Chief Electoral Officer determines the number of seats in the House of Commons and publishes the information in the Canada Gazette. Electoral boundaries commissions then determine the adjustments to the constituency boundaries. The federal electoral boundaries commissions are independent bodies that make all decisions regarding the proposed and final federal electoral boundaries. Elections Canada provides support services to the boundaries commission in each province. Based on reports from these commissions, the Chief Electoral Officer prepares a representation order that describes the boundaries and specifies the name and the population of each FED. The representation order is in force on the first dissolution of Parliament that occurs at least seven months after its proclamation. The 2013 Representation Order (proclaimed on October 5, 2013) was based on 2011 Census population counts, and increased the number of FEDs to 338, up from 308 from the previous 2003 Representation Order. Ontario received fifteen additional seats, Alberta and British Columbia each gained six seats while Quebec added three seats. On June 19, 2014, the Riding Name Change Act, 2014 (Bill C-37) received Royal Assent changing the names of 31 FEDs. The names of FEDs may change at any time through an Act of Parliament.

  • The National Railway Network (NRWN), version 1.0 focuses on providing a quality geometric description and a set of basic attributes of Canadian rail phenomena. The NRWN product is distributed in the form of eleven provincial or territorial datasets and consists of one linear feature (Track), four punctual features (Junction, Crossing, Marker Post, and Station), and one linear or punctual feature (Structure) with which is associated a series of descriptive attributes such as, among others: Track Classification, Track Name, Track Operator, Track User, Gauge, Number of Tracks, Electrification, Design Speeds, Subdivision Name; Junction Type; Level of Crossing, Crossing Type, Warning System, Transport Canada Identifier; Station Name, Station Type, Station User, Number of platforms; Structure Type. The available output file format for the product are: GML (Geography Markup Language) in ASCII and SHAPE (ESRI - TM) and KML (Keyhole Markup Language).

  • This is a legacy product that is no longer supported. It may not meet current government standards. The Canadian Digital Surface Model (CDSM) is part of Natural Resources Canada's altimetry system designed to better meet the users' needs for elevation data and products. The 0.75-second (~20 m) CDSM consists of a derived product from the original 1-second (30 m) Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) digital surface model (DSM). In these data, the elevations are captured at the top of buildings, trees, structures, and other objects rather than at ground level. A CDSM mosaic can be obtained for a pre-defined or user-defined extent. The coverage and resolution of a mosaic varies according to the extent of the requested area. Derived products such as slope, shaded relief and colour shaded relief maps can also be generated on demand by using the Geospatial-Data Extraction tool. Data can then be saved in many formats. The pre-packaged GeoTiff datasets are based on the National Topographic System of Canada (NTS) at the 1:50 000 scale; the NTS index file is available in the Resources section in many formats.

  • The manmade features of the CanVec series include dams, protection structures (breakwater, dike/levees), liquid storage facilities (basin, swimming pool, etc.), tanks, buildings, delimiting structures (fence, walls, etc.), landmark features (cross, radar, crane, forts, etc.), chimneys, towers, sewage pipelines, conduit bridges, waste, leisure areas, residential areas, commercial and institutional areas and ritual cultural areas (shrine, cemeteries, etc.). The CanVec multiscale series is available as prepackaged downloadable files and by user-defined extent via a Geospatial data extraction tool. Related Products: [Topographic Data of Canada - CanVec Series](https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/8ba2aa2a-7bb9-4448-b4d7-f164409fe056)