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    Each summer, environmental community groups collect important data to determine if groupings of fish, shrimp and crab – what is called a community- can be used as an indicator of the health status of bays and estuaries. Sampling was conducted from May through September for the first years then from June through August. In 2018 and 2019, the sampling was conducted just once in each estuary. Community group members and staff sample six stations once a month in their designated estuary. Fish, shrimps and crabs are collected with a beach seine net and later released live back to the water once identified and counted. From this, the community groups provide important information to Fisheries and Oceans Canada, including: - identification and numbers of fish, shrimp and crab species; - water conditions and samples; - information on aquatic plants; - sediment samples. With this information, Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists working with government agencies and universities can conduct analyses to determine the suitability of indicators to assess the health of bays and estuaries. PARAMETERS COLLECTED: Parameters: abundance, species richness, species developmental stage (young-of-the-year or adult), water temperature, water salinity, water dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic nutrient (nitrate, nitrite, phosphate), sediment % organic content, sediment % humidity content and sediment mean grain size, % submerged aquatic vegetation cover NOTES ON QUALITY CONTROL: Data entry into Excel and first quality control verification is done by CAMP summer students. A second quality control verification is done by DFO staff. See publ # 2823 attached to this record. In 2018, the historical data was migrated into a relationship database. From this year on, annual data will be entered into the database using a custom application. The application front end has numerous QC elements built-in. SAMPLING METHODS: Please see the following URL for sampling details: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/319437.pdf

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    Summary The Quebec region of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) is responsible for the assessment of several fish and invertebrate stocks exploited in the Estuary and the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. The commercial catches sampling program is one of the sources of information used to complete these assessments. The data collected by this program, at wharf or at sea, offers among other things the advantage of a relatively large spatio-temporal coverage and provides some of the necessary knowledge to assess the demography and the structure of the exploited populations. This program is implemented by specialized DFO staff whose main mandate is to collect biological data on groundfish, pelagic fish and marine invertebrate species that are commercially exploited in the various marine communities. Data This dataset on the redfish (Sebastes sp.) includes the metadata, sample weight, fish length, the sex and the number of specimens measured. This dataset covers the periods of 1980-1996, 1999-2013, 2015-2016 and 2019. In order to protect the confidentiality of the sources, some informations (such as those concerning the vessel) have been excluded and others (such as the date of capture) have been simplified. Entries where there was only one vessel in a fishing area for a given year were also excluded. Further information including the fishing areas coordinates can be found by clicking on the «Atlantic and Arctic commercial fisheries» and «Fishing areas» links below.

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    In place since 1994 in eastern Canada, the sentinel fisheries program is the result of a collaboration between Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and commercial fishermen. Under this program, contracts are awarded by tender to fishermen to carry out fishing activities according to scientific protocols developed by DFO. Description of fixed surveys The fixed gear sentinel fisheries of the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence are conducted in the divisions 4R, 4S and 3Pn of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO). The gear used is fixed gillnets or longlines. Fishing activities with nets must have a mesh size of 5 ½ inches (140mm) and are limited to a maximum of 12 to 20 nets depending on the region. Longline fishing activities, for its part, must be carried out with traditional J #16 or C #12 hooks and are limited to a maximum of 1000 hooks. Data For every fishing activity, the total catch is sorted and weighed by species. Biological data such as length, weight (sampled, per individual, gonad, liver and stomach), sex and maturity are then collected on a sub-sample of cod and Atlantic halibut. Otoliths are only sampled on Atlantic cod. The catches per tow (presence or absence, count by species, length frequency and catch weight (kg)) are available below. * The most recent survey is not available ** This record consist of raw data and quality has not been verified

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    Pacific Herring spawn index data for British Columbia from 1951 to present. Note that the spawn index is a relative index of spawning biomass. In addition, “NA" indicates that data are unavailable because they are either incomplete or withheld; contact the custodian for more information. For the "Region" column specifically, "NA" indicates that the location is outside stock assessment region boundaries. There are a few caveats to consider when interpreting Pacific Herring spawn index data, which are discussed in the technical report (see supporting documents).

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    With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past couple of decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e. Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2010 and 2017, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites across coastal Canada. The study areas include Beaufort Sea, Mackenzie Delta channels and Banks Island in the western Canadian Arctic; James Bay, Hudson Bay, Nunavik, Resolute Bay, Victoria Strait, Baffin Island and Coronation Gulf in the eastern Canadian Arctic; Labrador, Bay of Fundy and Chedabucto Bay in Atlantic Canada and Kitimat, Haida Gwaii and Burrard Inlet in the northern Pacific. Data was collected during ice-free and low tide conditions (where applicable) between July and September. Low-altitude helicopter surveys were conducted at each study site to capture video of the shoreline characteristics. In addition to acquiring videography, ground-based observations were recorded in several locations for validation. Shoreline segmentation was then carried out by manual interpretation of the oblique videography and the photos aided by ancillary data. This involved splitting and classifying the shoreline vectors based on homogeneity of the upper intertidal zone. Detailed geomorphological information (i.e. shoreline type, substrate, slope, height, accessibility etc.) describing the upper intertidal, lower intertidal, supratidal and backshore zones was extracted from the video and entered into a geospatial database using a customized data collection form. In addition, biological characteristics like biobands, water features, fauna, human use etc. observed along the coast were recorded. The data was also validated through ground samples (when available) and a second interpreter QA (quality analysis) was performed on each dataset (excluding Nunavik) to ensure high quality and consistency. The final dataset contains segments ranging in length from 150 metres to 2500 metres. In total, from 2010 to 2017, within the 14 study sites, about 26,150 km of shoreline were mapped.

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    PURPOSE: The objective of the sea scallop survey is to obtain fishery independent data on the abundance, size distribution and location of scallops in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence and to provide science advice on stock status to fishery managers, decision makers and industry stakeholders. DESCRIPTION: The sea scallop research survey is conducted on CCGS MPerley (or chartered vessels) and has stratified random sampling. For each tow (or sample), data is recorded on tow, all specimens caught, geolocation, shell height frequency and biological samples. PARAMETERS COLLECTED: Catch number (biological), catch weight (biological), individual lengths (biological), age (biological), meat weight (biological). PHYSICAL SAMPLE DETAILS: A sub-sample of scallop shells is retained and analysed for age determination in the lab. SAMPLING METHODS: From 2012 to 2016, an annual, rotational, multispecies research survey program for scallop in the sGSL was conducted to obtain fishery independent indices of abundance, biomass estimates, and biological characteristics information (shell height, meat weight, sex, clappers). One section of a SFA or the SFA in its entirety was surveyed per year, with the exception of SFA 23 which was excluded because of the low scallop fishing effort reported from this area in recent years. From 2019 to 2023, annual surveys were conducted on the three major beds in the Northumberland Strait (West Point and Cape Tormentine in SFA 22, Pictou in SFA 24), using a similar methodology as the previous surveys. Methodology can be found in the Science Advisory Report and the Research Document listed in the citations list. USE LIMITATION: Please contact the data custodians before attempting to use this information in support of any kind of scientific analyses.

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    Summary The Quebec region of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) is responsible for the assessment of several fish and invertebrate stocks exploited in the Estuary and the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. The commercial catches sampling program is one of the sources of information used to complete these assessments. The data collected by this program, at wharf or at sea, offers among other things the advantage of a relatively large spatio-temporal coverage and provides some of the necessary knowledge to assess the demography and the structure of the exploited populations. This program is implemented by specialized DFO staff whose main mandate is to collect biological data on groundfish, pelagic fish and marine invertebrate species that are commercially exploited in the various marine communities. Data This dataset on the capelin (Mallotus villosus) includes the metadata, sample weight, fish length, the sex and the number of specimens measured. This dataset covers the period of 1988 to present. In order to protect the confidentiality of the sources, some informations (such as those concerning the vessel) have been excluded and others (such as the date of capture) have been simplified. Entries where there was only one vessel in a fishing area for a given year were also excluded. Further information including the fishing areas coordinates can be found by clicking on the «Atlantic and Arctic commercial fisheries» and «Fishing areas» links below.

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    A research survey on American lobster (Homarus americanus) has been conducted annually in the Magdalen Islands since 1995 to assess the abundance and structure of lobster populations in this area. Starting in 2007, the main objective was modified to include the diversity and abundance of benthic species associated with lobster habitat. Only benthic species data associated with lobster habitat are presented in this dataset. Surveys were generally conducted during the first two weeks of September from 2007 to 2020 on the entire south side of the Magdalen Islands, from Grosse-Île to Havre-Aubert. The sampling plan consists of 70 trawl tows on 50 fixed stations, between 4 and 35 meters in depth. Some stations had double tows. Specimens were collected using a Nephrops-type door trawl with a total width of 3.04 meters consisting of four Vexar™ lined baskets of 19 millimeter mesh size in order to harvest small individuals. Start and end positions were recorded to calculate the distance traveled at each tow using the geosphere library in R. The year 2011 is not included in the dataset, as biodiversity data were not recorded. Since 2017, the average tow distance has been reduced from 1000 meters to 500 meters. The opening of the trawl is also noted every minute throughout the duration of the tow so that the area sampled can be calculated. The area covered in each tow was the product of the trawl opening and the distance traveled. The two files provided (DarwinCore format) are complementary and are linked by the "eventID" key. The "Event_data" file includes generic activity information, including date and location. The "Occurrence" file includes the taxonomy of the observed species, identified to the species or lowest possible taxonomic level. For abundance and biomass estimates, contact Benoît Bruneau (Benoit.Bruneau@dfo-mpo.gc.ca). For quality controls, all taxonomic names were checked against the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) to match recognized standards. The WoRMS match was placed in the "ScientificnameID" field of the occurrence file. Special cases were noted in the "identificationRemarks" field and selected specimens were confirmed with field photos mentioned in "associatedMedia". Data quality checks were performed using the R obistools and WORMS libraries. All sampling locations were spatially validated.

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    Species characterization by environmental DNA (eDNA) is a method that allows the use of DNA released into the environment by organisms from various sources (secretions, faeces, gametes, tissues, etc.). It is a complementary tool to standard sampling methods for the identification of biodiversity. This project provides a list of fish and marine mammal species whose DNA has been detected in water samples collected between 2019 and 2021 using the mitochondrial marker MiFish (12S). The surveys were carried out in the summer of 2019 (July 14-18) and (July 30 - August 5), in the fall of 2020 (October 27-28) and in the summer-fall of 2021 (May 31 - June 3 ) and (August 24-25) between Forestville and Godbout (Haute-Côte-Nord). Sampling was carried out between 1-50 meters depth in 91 stations, with 1 to 3 replicates per station. Two liters of water were filtered through a 1.2 µm fiberglass filter. DNA extractions were performed with the DNeasy Blood and Tissues or PowerWater extraction kit (Qiagen). Negative field, extraction and PCR controls were added at the different stages of the protocol. The libraries were prepared either by Génome Québec (2019, 2020) or by the Genomics Laboratory of the Maurice-Lamontagne Institute (2021), then sequenced on a NovaSeq 4000 PE250 system by Génome Québec. The bioinformatics analysis of the sequences obtained was carried out using an analysis pipeline developed in the genomics laboratory. A first step made it possible to obtain a table of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTU) using the cutadapt software for the removal of the adapters and the R package DADA2 for the filtration, the fusion, removal of chimeras and compilation of data. The MOTUs table was then corrected using the R package metabaR to eliminate the tag-jumping and take contaminants into consideration. Samples showing a strong presence of contaminating MOTUs were removed from the dataset. The MOTUs were also filtered to remove all remaining adapter sequences and also retain only those of the expected size (around 170 bp). Finally, taxonomic assignments were made on the MOTUs using the BLAST+ program and the NCBI-nt database. Taxonomic levels (species, genus or family) were assigned using a best match method (Top hit), with a threshold of 95%. Only assignments at the level of fish and marine mammals were considered, and the taxa detected were compared to a list of regional species, and corrected if necessary. The species detections of the different replicas have been combined. The file provided includes generic activity information, including site, station name, date, marker type, assignment types used for taxa identification, and a list of taxa or species. The list of taxa has been verified by a biodiversity expert from the Maurice-Lamontagne Institute. This project was funded by Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Coastal Environmental Baseline Data Program under the Oceans Protection Plan. This initiative aims to acquire baseline environmental data that contributes to the characterization of significant coastal areas and supports evidence-based assessments and management decisions to preserve marine ecosystems. Data were also published on SLGO platform : https://doi.org/10.26071/ogsl-2239bca5-c24a

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    Ocean physical conditions in the Maritimes Region in 2019 were characterized by cooler surface temperatures, continued warmer bottom temperatures and weaker stratification compared to recent years. Deep nutrient inventories were lower than normal over most of the region, with the exception of the Cabot Strait section where deep nutrients were near or higher than normal during the spring sampling and associated with record-warm water. Anomalies of surface nutrients were negative across the region, with the exception of positive anomalies observed at the deep shelf and offshore stations of the Louisbourg section. The spring phytoplankton bloom was near or slightly earlier than normal across the Scotian Shelf (SS) with near-normal duration. Peak chlorophyll a concentrations during the spring bloom occurred within a narrow time window across the SS. At Halifax-2 (HL2), the spring bloom was characterized by a high amplitude, and a rapid progression and decline. Plankton community changes persisted in 2019 with lower abundance of large phytoplankton (diatoms), mainly lower-than-normal biomass of zooplankton and abundance of Calanus finmarchicus, and higher-than-normal abundance of non-copepods. Arctic Calanus and warm-shelf copepods showed mixed abundance anomalies in 2019, reversing the pattern of 2018. Above-normal abundances of Oithona atlantica, especially at HL2, suggest a greater influence of offshore waters in recent years. Surface temperature in the Bedford Basin was near normal in 2019 with mainly cooler-than-normal temperatures from January to June and near- or slightly-above-normal temperatures from July to December. Bottom temperature and salinity were below normal in 2019 with near- or slightly-above-normal conditions at the start of the year and progressing toward cooler and fresher water from February to December. Surface and deep nitrate, phosphate and silicate were near or below normal, with surface phosphate reaching a record low in 2019. The 2018 Continuous Plankton Recorder data indicated an annual abundance of diatoms close to normal for the Eastern (ESS) and Western Scotian Shelf (WSS), while the abundance of dinoflagellates and the Phytoplankton Colour Index values were near (WSS) or above (ESS) normal. The annual abundance of Calanus CI-IV was near normal (ESS) or slightly below normal (WSS), while C. finmarchicus CV-VI levels were slightly below (ESS) or below (WSS) normal. The abundance of Calanus glacialis (ESS, WSS) and Para/Pseudocalanus and Limacina spp. (WSS) were lower than normal, while that of coccolithphore (ESS, WSS), and copepod nauplii and foraminifera (ESS) was higher than normal. "