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RI_623

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    Growing degree days (GDDs) are used to estimate the growth and development of plants and insects during the growing season. Growing Degree Day are computed by subtracting a base value temperature from the mean daily temperature and are assigned a value of zero if negative. Base temperatures are a point below which development does not occur for the organism in question. Growing Degree Day products are created for base 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees Celsius. GDD values are only accumulated during the Growing Season, April 1 through October 31.

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    Minimum Temperature represents the lowest recorded temperature value (°C) at each location for a given time period. Time periods include the previous 24 hours and the previous 7 days from the available date where a climate day starts at 0600UTC.

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    A magnitude 5.9 earthquake near Montreal, along the Milles-Îles Fault. This fault is not known to be active, but this scenario represents a small but damaging event near the City of Montreal.

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    Last Spring Frost (-4 °C) is defined as the average day, during the first half of the year, of the last occurrence of a minimum temperature at or below -4 °C. These values are calculated across Canada in 10x10 km cells.

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    The Agri-Environmental Indicator of Risk of Water Contamination by Phosphorus dataset estimates the relative risk of phosphorus loss from Soil Landscapes of Canada agricultural areas to surface water. The data series for this indicator consists of four (4) datasets: Annual P-Balance, Soil-P-Source, Edge of Field and IROWC-P. Products in this data series present results for predefined areas as defined by the Soil Landscapes of Canada (SLC v.3.2) data series, uniquely identified by SOIL_LANDSCAPE_ID values.

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    The Denali Fault spans over 200km of the Yukon Territory, and is a significant source of seismic hazard. This magnitude 7.4 earthquake scenario, centered near small communities along the Alaska Highway, visualizes the effects of a severe earthquake that could be produced by this fault.

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    Frost Day Count (-2 °C) is defined as the count of the number of days in a calendar month where the minimum daily temperature for the climate day was at or below -2 °C. These values are calculated across Canada in 10x10 km cells.

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    In 2015, a magnitude 4.7 earthquake occurred 60 km beneath Sidney, BC. This scenario visualizes the effects of that event if it had a magnitude of 7.1.

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    Growing Season Frost Free Period (-2 °C) is defined as the count of the number of days from the day after the last spring frost (-2 °C) to the day before the first fall frost (-2 °C). These values are calculated across Canada in 10x10 km cells.

  • Statistically downscaled multi-model ensembles of mean temperature are available at a 10km spatial resolution for 1951-2100. Statistically downscaled ensembles are based on output from twenty-four Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models (GCM). Downscaled daily mean temperature was calculated by averaging downscaled daily minimum and maximum temperature. Daily minimum and maximum temperature from GCM outputs were downscaled using the Bias Correction/Constructed Analogues with Quantile mapping version 2 (BCCAQv2). Historical gridded minimum and maximum temperature datasets of Canada (ANUSPLIN) were used as the respective downscaling targets. The 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentiles of the monthly, seasonal and annual ensembles of downscaled mean temperature (°C) are available for the historical time period, 1951-2005, and for emission scenarios, RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, for 2006-2100. Note: Projections among climate models can vary because of differences in their underlying representation of earth system processes. Thus, the use of a multi-model ensemble approach has been demonstrated in recent scientific literature to likely provide better projected climate change information.