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  • The Arctic SDI Topographic Basemap is a WMTS service provided by Arctic SDI - a cooperation between the national mapping agencies in Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and US. It contains basic topographic information coming from these authoritative data sources:: Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation - National Resources Canada, Danish Agency for Data Supply and Efficiency, National Land Survey of Finland, National Land Survey of Iceland, Norwegian Mapping Authority, Norwegian Polar Institute, Russian Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Mapping, Swedish Mapping, Cadastre and Land Registration Authority and United States Geological Survey.

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    View service showing administrative units for states in the Arctic SDI.

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    The map shows the distribution area of North East Arctic Saithe.

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    The map shows the distribution of Greenland Halibut.\\nLatin name: Reinhardtius hippoglossoides\\nFamily: Pleuronectidae (Flounder Family)\\nDistribution: Along the edge of the UK sector of Franz Josef Land, and in deeper areas of the Barents Sea\\nSpawning Area: Mainly along the edge between Vesterålen and Spitsbergen\\nSpawning Season: Winter\\nCharacteristics: An Arctic fish species that is rarely observed.

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    Carbonate in surface sediments.

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    The map shows the distribution of Greenland shark. Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is a large shark in family Somniosidae that can be the size of the largest white sharks. It is the haisort in the world who live far north of the Arctic waters, especially in the seas between Greenland and Iceland, at 200-600 m depth

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    A WMS containing shadow reliefs of the ocean depths that also cover northern polar regions. Data from GEBCO_08 Grid, version 20100927, http://www.gebco.net, and the Mareano project, http://www.mareano.no. The grid from Mareano is more up-to-date and also usually closer to Norwegian land areas or in Arctic areas. It is being continually expanded under the auspices of the Mareano project. (http://www.mareano.no/start) * The terrain models are based on modern depth measurements by the use of multi-beam echosounders. * The terrain models are based on the average depth value in the area. The area which this data covers is the seabed along the coast of Northern Norway, north of 67 degrees north, and the parts of the ocean west in the Norwegian Sea. The coverage is limited to the areas which have been measured with modern equipment, that is, multi-beam echosounders. The General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) aims to provide the most authoritative, publicly-available bathymetry data sets for the world’s oceans. GEBCO operates under the auspices of the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO. The latest version of their grid is from 2014, a global 30 arc-second interval grid. Their one arc-minute interval grid was last updated in 2008. (Source in Norwegian: https://www.gebco.net/data_and_products/gridded_bathymetry_data/) Data from the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean – IBCAO (netsite: www.ibcao.org). Only useful for background information. Reference: Jakobsson, M., Macnab, R., Mayer, M., Anderson, R., Edwards, M., Hatzky, J., Schenke, H-W., and Johnson, P., 2008, An improved bathymetric portrayal of the Arctic Ocean: Implications for ocean modeling and geological, geophysical and oceanographic analyses, v. 35, L07602, Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2008GL033520

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    The map shows the distribution of White whale. Latin: Delphinapterus leucas. White whales are found in most arctic and sub arctic waters, including the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas. However, their distribution is somewhat disjointed in that they are virtually nonexistent in the Greenland Sea. A small, southern population of white whales resides in the St Lawrence River in Canada. In Svalbard, white whales exhibit a tightly coastal distribution, never leaving the near-shore waters of the Archipelago.

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    The map shows the distribution of Harbour seal. Latin name: Phoca vitulina. Family: Phocidae. Distribution: Sub Arctic waters along the east and west coasts of both the North Atlantic and north Pacific. In Norway they occur in colonies along the Norwegian mainland coast and on Prins Karls Forland in Svalbard. The harbour seals occur mainly in nearshore areas that are protected against wave action.

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    The map shows the distribution of Narwhal. Latin: Monodon monoceros The distribution of narwhal is largely confined to the North Atlantic region. They are most numerous in the eastern Canadian Arctic and along the coasts of Greenland. They also occur in the northern parts of Svalbard and the Franz Josef Land Archipelagos.