cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

RI_536

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  • A systematic oceanographic monitoring program was initiated in September 1989 at twenty-five monitoring stations in the Passamaquoddy Bay area and approaches by Dr. Shawn Robinson based out of the St. Andrews Biological Station (SABS). Stations were established in a uniform grid pattern of two arcminutes latitude and longitude over the study area in order to develop a database on the spatial patterns of water properties. Monthly measurements of the water column for the temperatures and salinity at all stations was completed using a Seacat SBE 19 internally recording CTD from Sea-bird Electronics Inc. The CTD was programmed to record conductivity, temperature, and depth at a frequency of 2 hz, corresponding to 2 measurements per meter of water depth. CTD casts were recorded for each of the 25 stations in the study area monthly using the R/V Pandalus, and later the CCGS Viola M. Davidson based out of SABS. The CTD was configured such that the sensors were oriented towards the benthos and the CTD was then attached to a hydraulic winch on the deck of the ship by a stainless steel cable one meter above a weight, and lowered 1 m below the water's surface in order for the CTD to equilibrate for one minute. The CTD was then lowered at 1 m/s to the benthos using a metered block on the winch to determine when the CTD had reached the maximum depth at that station. Once the weight had touched the bottom, the CTD was retrieved from the water, turned off, and placed in a bucket of fresh seawater in order to minimize equilibration time at the next station. Initially, the CTD measured salinity via water forced through the salinity cell with the drop rate of 1 m/s, but in August 1992, a pump was mounted on the CTD in order to provide a more consistent flow of water across the salinity cell. Surface temperatures were measured from bucket samples collected upon arriving at each station using a hand-held mercury thermometer at each station, and Secchi disk measurements were recorded. All data were downloaded from the CTD upon return to SABS using a DFO computer and the proprietary Sea-Soft software. Downcast data from each profile was retained, binned into 1 m intervals, and processed to remove data spikes, density inversions, and anomalies due to inadequate instrument equilibration. Processed data was then stored in the DFO's Oracle database (PTRAN) under the IMTA_SABS schema in the INVHYD and INVINF tables. Station numbers and locations are recorded in the CTD_STATIONS table in the IMTA_SABS schema.

  • Long-term freshwater quality data from federal and federal-provincial sampling sites throughout Canada's aquatic ecosystems are included in this dataset. Measurements regularly include physical-chemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, major ions, nutrients and metals. Collection includes data from active sites, as well as historical sites that have a period of record suitable for trend analysis. Sampling frequencies vary according to monitoring objectives. The number of sites in the network varies slightly from year-to-year, as sites are adjusted according to a risk-based adaptive management framework. The Great Lakes are sampled on a rotation basis and not all sites are sampled every year. Data are collected to meet federal commitments related to transboundary watersheds (rivers and lakes crossing international, inter-provincial and territorial borders) or under authorities such as the Department of the Environment Act, the Canada Water Act, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, or to meet Canada's commitments under the 1969 Master Agreement on Apportionment.

  • This dataset presents the places of interest of the City of Montreal according to the classification carried out under the [Montreal on foot] initiative (https://fairemtl.ca/fr/montreal-pied) (MàP). The Montréal à Pied project (MÀP) aims to improve the orientation and pedestrian path throughout Montréal. The data relate to the territory of the boroughs, but places of interest may be found in the territory of linked cities for better consistency of geographical information. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • Electromagnetic anomalies represent anomalies from aerial geophysical surveys. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • Quaternary geology includes information related to morpho-sedimentological zones, surface morphology, erratic blocks, glacial erosion marks and observation sites. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • The administrative dividing layers offered at the scales of 1/20 000 and 1/100 000 allow the location of boundaries for the following components: * Boroughs and agglomerations; * Municipalities, Unorganized Territories and Aboriginal Territories; * Administrative Regions, Metropolitan Communities, and MRC; * Border , the interprovincial borders, and the Quebec—Newfoundland and Labrador border. For the 1/100 000 scale version, the initial 1/20 000 scale cut data are adjusted to the corresponding planimetric components at the 1/100 000 scale. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • This series of datasets has been created by AAFC’s National Agroclimate Information Service (NAIS) of the Agro-Climate, Geomatics and Earth Observations (ACGEO) Division of the Science and Technology Branch. The CDM is a composite product developed from a wide assortment of information such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), streamflow values, Palmer Drought Index, and drought indicators used by the agriculture, forest and water management sectors. Drought prone regions are analyzed based on precipitation, temperature, drought model index maps, and climate data and are interpreted by federal, provincial and academic scientists. Once a consensus is reached, a monthly map showing drought designations for Canada is digitized. AAFC’s National Agroclimate Information Service (NAIS) updates this dataset on a monthly basis, usually by the 10th of every month to correspond to the end of the previous month, and subsequent Canadian input into the larger North American Drought Monitor (NA-DM). The drought areas are classified as follows: D0 (Abnormally Dry) – represents an event that occurs once every 3-5 years; D1 (Moderate Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 5-10 years; D2 (Severe Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 10-20 years; D3 (Extreme Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 20-25 years; and D4 (Exceptional Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 50 years. Impact lines highlight areas that have been physically impacted by drought. Impact labels specify the longitude and magnitude of impacts. The impact labels are classified as follows: S – Short-Term, typically less than 6 months (e.g. agriculture, grasslands). L – Long-Term, typically more than 6 months (e.g. hydrology, ecology).

  • The National Parks and National Park Reserves of Canada Legislative Boundaries web service includes the following lands: 1) National Parks of Canada as defined in Schedule 1 of the Canada National Parks Act, 2) National Park Reserves of Canada as defined in Schedule 2 of the Canada National Parks Act, 3) Rouge National Urban Park as defined in the Rouge National Urban Park Act and 4) Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park as defined in the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park Act. The Data available for download is the former National Framework Canada Lands Administrative Boundaries Level 1 product. There are some attribute differences between the data available for download and the web service; however both contain the same underlying data. Please refer to the Supporting Documents for additional information on the National Framework Canada Lands Administrative Boundaries Level 1 dataset. Work is under way to align these two data products. As well, the Comprehensive Claims Settlement Areas have been removed from this dataset, but can be obtained from the Post-1975 Treaties (Modern Treaties) dataset produced by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

  • The Aboriginal Lands of Canada Legislative Boundaries web service includes legislative boundaries of Indian Reserves, Land Claim Settlement Lands (lands created under Comprehensive Land Claims Process that do not or will not have Indian Reserve status under the Indian Act) and Indian Lands. More specifically it includes the following lands: 1) Indian Reserves that include: 1.1) surrendered lands or a reserve, as defined in the Indian Act (this definition excludes Indian Settlements and Indian Communities); and 1.2) Sechelt lands, as defined in the Sechelt Indian Band Self-Government Act, chapter 27 of the Statutes of Canada, 1986; 2) Land Claim Settlement Lands that include: 2.1) Category IA land or Category IA-N land, as defined in the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act, chapter 18 of the Statutes of Canada, 1984 (category 1B and category II Lands are excluded from this definition); 2.2) Settlement land, as defined in the Yukon First Nations Self-Government Act, and lands in which an interest is transferred or recognized under section 21 of that Act (only Yukon First Nations Settlement Lands, which were surveyed and the survey plan recorded, are included in the map service); 2.3) Inuit Owned Lands as defined in the Agreement between the Inuit of the Nunavut Settlement Area and Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada given effect and declared valid by the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act (it includes all parcels that have been surveyed and those that do not require a survey (this includes the islands)); 2.4) Gwich’in Lands as defined in the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement, given effect and declared valid by the Gwich’in Land Claim Settlement Act; 2.5) Inuvialuit Lands as defined in the Western Arctic (Inuvialuit) Claims Settlement Act; 2.6) Sahtu Lands as defined in The Sahtu Dene and Métis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement given effect and declared valid by the Sahtu Dene and Métis Land Claim Settlement Act; and 2.7) Tlicho lands, as defined in the Tlicho Agreement, given effect and declared valid by the Tlicho Land Claims and Self-Government Act; 3) Indian Lands that include: 3.1) Lands in the Kanesatake Mohawk interim land base, as defined in the Kanesatake Mohawk Interim Land Base Governance Act, other than the lands known as Doncaster Reserve No. 17. The data available for download is the former Geobase-Aboriginal Lands product. There are some attribute differences between the data available for download and the web service; however both contain the same underlying data. Please refer to the Supporting Documents for additional information on the Geobase - Aboriginal Lands dataset. Work is under way to align these two data products.

  • Mining activities include information relating to mining operations (active mine) and advanced mining exploration projects (development and development). **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**