cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

RI_543

1312 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
status
From 1 - 10 / 1312
  • This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database and it covers various locations across the Canadian Arctic i.e. James Bay, Resolute Bay and the south coast of Devon Island, the south-west coast of Hudson Bay, Labrador Coast, Victoria Strait, Beaufort Sea, and the North-east coast of Baffin Island. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone. This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where the treatment or cleanup activities take place. The basic parameter that defines the shoreline type is the material that is present in the intertidal zone. The presence or absence of sediments is a key factor in determining whether oil is stranded on the surface of a substrate or can penetrate and/or be buried. This dataset contains thousands of linear shoreline segments ranging in length from 200 m and 2 km long. The entities represent the location of the segments and their geomorphological description. There exist further fields in the attribute table for this dataset. We are currently working on standardizing our shoreline segmentation datasets and the updated data will soon be uploaded to the catalog. Sergy, G. (2008). The Shoreline Classification Scheme for SCAT and Oil Spill Response in Canada. Proceedings of the 31stArctic and Marine Oil Spill Program Technical Seminar.Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, Pp. 811-819.

  • The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS ) is one of the most sophisticated sensors that is used in a wide range of applications related to land, ocean and atmosphere. It has 36 spectral channels with spatial resolution varying between 250 m and 1 km at nadir. MODIS channels 1 (B1, visible) and 2 (B2, near infrared) are available at 250 m spatial resolution, an additional five channels for terrestrial applications (bands B3 to B7) are available at 500 m spatial resolution, the other twenty-nine channels not included in this data set capture images with a spatial resolution of 1 km. The MODIS record begins in March 2000 and extends to present with daily measurements over the globe. This level 3 product for Canada was created from the following original Level 1 (1B) MODIS data (collection 5): a) MOD02QKM - Level 1B 250 m swath data, 5 min granules; b ) MOD02HKM - level 1B , 500 m swath data, 5 min granules; c) MOD03 - level 1 geolocation information, 1 km swath data, 5 min granules. All these data are available from the DAAC Earth Observing System Data Gateway (NASA http://ladsweb.nascom.nasa.gov/data/search.html). The terrestrial channels MODIS (B3 to B7) at 500 m spatial resolution were reduced to 250 m with an adaptive regression system and normalization described in Trishchenko et al. (2006, 2009), and the data were mapped using a Lambert Conformal Conic (LCC ) projection (Khlopenkov et al., 2008). These data were combined to form pan-Canadian images using a technique for detection of clear sky, clouds and cloud shadows with a maximum interval of 10 days (Luo et al., 2008). Atmospheric and sun-sensor geometry corrections have not been applied. For each date, data include forward and backward scattering observations as separate files. This allows data to be optimized for a given application. For general use, data from either forward or backward scattering or both should be used. Future release of the MODIS time series will correct the forward and backward scattering geometry to provide a single best observation for each pixel.

  • As part of a scientific assessment of critical habitat for boreal woodland caribou (Environment Canada 2011, see full reference in accompanying documentation), Environment Canada's Landscape Science and Technology Division was tasked with providing detailed anthropogenic disturbance mapping, across known caribou ranges, as of 2015. This data comprises a 5-year update to the mapping of 2008-2010 disturbances, and allows researchers to better understand the attributes that have a known effect on caribou population persistence. The original disturbance mapping was based on 30-metre resolution Landsat-5 imagery from 2008 -2010. The mapping process used in 2010 was repeated using 2015 Landsat imagery to create a nationally consistent, reliable and repeatable geospatial dataset that followed a common methodology. The methods developed were focused on mapping disturbances at a specific point of time, and were not designed to identify the age of disturbances, which can be of particular interest for disturbances that can be considered non-permanent, for example cutblocks. The resultant datasets were used for a caribou resource selection function (habitat modeling) and to assess overall disturbance levels on each caribou ranges. Anthropogenic disturbances within 51 caribou ranges across Canada were mapped. The ranges were defined by individual provinces and territories across Canada. Disturbances were remapped across these ranges using 2015 Landsat-8 satellite imagery to provide the most up-to-date data possible. As with the 2010 mapping project, anthropogenic disturbance was defined as any human-caused disturbance to the natural landscape that could be visually identified from Landsat imagery with 30-metre multi-band imagery at a viewing scale of 1:50,000. A minimum mapping unit MMU of 2 ha (approximately 22 contiguous 30-metre pixels) was selected. Each disturbance feature type was represented in the database by a line or polygon depending on their geometric description. Polygonal disturbances included: cutblocks, mines, reservoirs, built-up areas, well sites, agriculture, oil and gas facilities, as well as unknown features. Linear disturbances included: roads, railways, powerlines, seismic exploration lines, pipelines, dams, air strips, as well as unknown features. For each type of anthropogenic disturbance, a clear description was established (see Appendix 7.2 of the science assessment) to maintain consistency in identifying the various disturbances in the imagery by the different interpreters. Features were only digitized if they were visible in the Landsat imagery at the prescribed viewing scale. A 2nd interpreter quality-control phase was carried out to ensure high quality, complete and consistent data collection. For this 2015 update an additional, separate higher-resolution database was created by repeating the process using 15-metre panchromatic imagery. For the 30-metre database only, the line and poly data were buffered by a 500-metre radius, representing their extended zone of impact upon boreal caribou herds. Additionally, forest fire polygons were merged into the anthropogenic footprint in order to create an overall disturbance footprint. These buffered datasets were used in the calculation of range disturbance levels and for integrated risk assessment analysis.

  • Localization and contact information of DFO offices. Find, search and locate DFO offices within Canada.

  • This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place. The basic parameter that defines the shoreline type is the material that is present in the intertidal zone. The presence or absence of sediments is a key factor in determining whether oil is stranded on the surface of a substrate or can penetrate and/or be buried. This dataset contains thousands of linear shoreline segments ranging in length from 200 m and 2 km long. The entities represent the location of the segments and their geomorphological description. There exist further fields in the attribute table for this dataset. We are currently working on standardizing our shoreline segmentation datasets and the updated data will soon be uploaded to the catalog. Sergy, G. (2008). The Shoreline Classification Scheme for SCAT and Oil Spill Response in Canada. Proceedings of the 31stArctic and Marine Oil Spill Program Technical Seminar.Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, Pp. 811-819.

  • Map shows the geography of the northern circumpolar region, north of approximately 55 degrees latitude. This product is derived from the Atlas of Canada's bilingual wall map "The Circumpolar Region - North" (MCR 0001). To limit the impact of aliasing of the annotation we rendered the map into two tiled web services with a service showing the 'base' information and the other the 'annotation.' Combined the two services more or less replicate the wall map online. In addition to the tiled services, the mxd and geodatabase in FGDB format are available for download. Note: Since the geodatabase was derived from a cartographic product not all features have attribute information even though they are labelled on the map. The map uses the azimuthal equidistant projection. Displayed on the map are the international boundaries, as well as the Canadian provincial and territorial boundaries, all current to 2014. Also shown are national capital cities, other cities, towns, villages and hamlets along with some seasonally populated places. The map identifies a number of significant northern features, including the median sea ice extent from September 1981 to 2010, the tree line, undersea relief, land relief, glaciers, ice fields and coastal ice shelves. Labelled are many of the physiographic and hydrographic features.

  • The surficial material dataset was developed as part of the Western Economic Partnership Agreement (WEPA) project covering all of NTS 73M, the southern three-quarters of 74D and southeast part of 84A. Part of the dataset was compiled by airphoto interpretations and followed by random ground-truthing by AGS geologists (NTS 73M). The dataset was later merged with other existing surficial geology maps (74D and 84A). The mapping scheme chosen for the 1:50 000 scale terrain classification is a variant of the scheme used in Alberta Geological Survey Bulletin 57 to map the surficial geology of the Sand River area (Map 178), NTS 73L, directly south of the study area. In this terrain classification scheme, each map unit includes a component of genesis, morphology and relief. Where available, additional information regarding the properties of the genetic unit was included as a genetic modifier. For example, the map unit 'sMh1' denotes hummocky (h), low relief (1), sandy (s) moraine (M). Genesis of geological material is considered to be the primary component of the map unit thus colours on the map depict differences in genesis. In the above example, the map unit colour would correspond to the legend colour chosen for moraine (M). An attempt has been made to reclassify the surficial geological units depicted in the surficial geology map of area NTS 74D (Map 148) using this mapping scheme, without significantly changing the polygon shapes of that previous work.

  • Coal zone boundary for the Mannville Coal Zone is based on subcrops generated by Alberta Geological Survey Special Report 007 (Regional Evaluation of the Coalbed Methane Potential in the Plains and Foothills of Alberta, Stratigraphy and Rank Study). We used additional coal picks from various sources to refine the boundary.

  • The Geological Atlas of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin was designed primarily as a reference volume documenting the subsurface geology of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. This GIS dataset is one of a collection of shapefiles representing part of Chapter 7 of the Atlas, Paleographic Evolution of the Cratonic Platform - Cambrian to Triassic, Figure 10, Carboniferous Banff/Lodgepole (DM5) Paleogeography. Shapefiles were produced from archived digital files created by the Alberta Geological Survey in the mid-1990s, and edited in 2005-06 to correct, attribute and consolidate the data into single files by feature type and by figure.

  • This GIS dataset depicts the permafrost areas of NTS map area 84N northwest (polygon features). The data are created in geodatabase format and output for public distribution in shapefile format.