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RI_539

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  • Historical earthquakes recorded by Earthquakes Canada. This serie is composed of 4 earthquake datasets. Each dataset contains the earthquakes grouped by decade; 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009, 2010-2019. However, the National Earthquake Database makes available seismic bulletin data from 1985 and onward. For a complete listing of current and historical earthquakes, visit http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/.

  • Historical earthquakes recorded by Earthquakes Canada. This dataset contains the earthquakes recorded in decade 2010. However, the National Earthquake Database makes available seismic bulletin data from 1985 and onward. For a complete listing of current and historical earthquakes, visit http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • Canada has the longest coastline in the world, measuring 243,790 kilometers. Many of our waterways along the coastline have to be dredged regularly to keep shipping channels and harbours open and safe for navigation; and this material is sometimes best disposed of at sea. Schedule 5 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) defines an exclusive list of materials and substances suitable for disposal at sea in Canada, which is in accordance with the London Protocol (1996). They are: dredged material, fish waste resulting from industrial fish processing operations, ships or platforms, inert and inorganic geological matter, uncontaminated organic matter of natural origin, and bulky substances. The disposal of any substance into the sea, on the seabed, in the subsoil of the seabed, or onto ice, from a ship, an aircraft, a platform or other structure is not allowed unless a permit is issued by the Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) Disposal at Sea Program. Incineration at sea, as well as importing or exporting a substance for disposal at sea is also prohibited. More information on Disposal at Sea is available at: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/disposal-at-sea.html The Active and Inactive Disposal at Sea Sites in Canadian Waters dataset provides spatial and related information of at-sea disposal sites approved for use in Canada in the last ten years and that remain open for consideration for additional use. Any additional use of a disposal site must be conducted in accordance with the terms and conditions of a valid Disposal at Sea permit. The dataset may be of use in relation to Disposal at Sea permit applications. For some Disposal at Sea permit applications the data may be of use in assessing serious harm to fish under the Fisheries Act and assessing interference with navigation under the Navigation Protection Act.

  • Species At Risk Act (SARA) describes Critical Habitat (CH) as the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species (schedule 1), and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in a recovery strategy or in an action plan for the species. CH spatial data exists for 116 of the 469 Environment Canada – Species At Risk (EC SAR) of interest, which includes draft, candidate, proposed and final CH spatial data that were provided by CWS regional offices. In order to protect sensitive CH information, or for some sharing data issues, CH sites were generalized using a 10km x 10km national grid. As mentioned before, each region provides NCR-CWS with their CH spatial data. After the generalization process, all results were merged to constitute the national view.

  • Map of Canada showing location of facilities reporting disposals and transfers for the most recent year, by reported total quantities. The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is Canada's public inventory of pollutant releases (to air, water and land), disposals and transfers for recycling. Under the authority of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), owners or operators of facilities in Canada that meet the published reporting requirements are required to report to the NPRI. Reported pollutants include toxic substances, air pollutants and other substances of concern. More NPRI datasets and mapping products are available here: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/tools-resources-data/access.html

  • Gridded pH of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence bottom waters including shallow waters. Data are a result of a 3D interpolation on a 1km x 1km x bottom depth grid. All the available CTD data sampled during the 2017 August and September multidisciplinary surveys were used. Purpose Since 1990, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans has been conducting an annual multidisciplinary survey in the Estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence using a standardized protocol. In the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, these bottom trawl surveys has been carrying out each September since 1971. These missions are an important source of information about the status of the marine ressources. The objectives of the surveys are multiple: to estimate the abundance and biomass of groundfish and invertebrates, to identify the spatial distribution and biological characteristics of these species, to monitor the biodiversity of the Estuary and Gulf and finally, to describe the environmental conditions observed in the area at the moment of the sampling. The southern Gulf surveys are realized using the following standardized protocol: Hurlbut,T. and D.Clay (eds) 1990. Protocols for Research Vessel Cruises within the Gulf Region (Demersal Fish) (1970-1987). Can. MS Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. No. 2082: 143p. The sampling protocols used for the Estuary and northern Gulf surveys are described in details in the following publications: Bourdages, H., Archambault, D., Bernier, B., Fréchet, A., Gauthier, J., Grégoire, F., Lambert, J., et Savard, L. 2010. Résultats préliminaires du relevé multidisciplinaire de poissons de fond et de crevette d’août 2009 dans le nord du golfe du Saint-Laurent. Rapp. stat. can. sci. halieut. aquat. 1226 : xii+ 72 p. Bourdages, H., Archambault, D., Morin, B., Fréchet, A., Savard, L., Grégoire, F., et Bérubé, M. 2003. Résultats préliminaires du relevé multidisciplinaire de poissons de fond et de crevette d’août 2003 dans le nord du golfe du Saint-Laurent. Secr. can. consult. sci. du MPO. Doc. rech. 2003/078. vi + 68 p. Annual reports are available at the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS), (http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/index-eng.htm). Bourdages, H., Brassard, C., Desgagnés, M., Galbraith, P., Gauthier, J., Légaré, B., Nozères, C. and Parent, E. 2017. Preliminary results from the groundfish and shrimp multidisciplinary survey in August 2016 in the Estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2017/002. v + 87 p.

  • Deep water (> 200 m) dissolved oxygen interpolated on a grid cell of 10 km x10 km in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. Input data are from the annual August multidisciplinary survey hold in 2008 to 2017. Purpose Since 1990, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans has been conducting an annual multidisciplinary survey in the Estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence using a standardized protocol. These surveys are an important source of information about the status of the marine ressources. The objectives of the survey are multiple: to estimate the abundance and biomass of groundfish and invertebrates, to identify the spatial distribution and biological characteristics of these species, to monitor the biodiversity of the Estuary and the northern Gulf and finally, to describe the environmental conditions observed in August in the sampling area. Annual reports are available at the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS), (http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/index-eng.htm). Bourdages, H., Brassard, C., Desgagnés, M., Galbraith, P., Gauthier, J., Légaré, B., Nozères, C. and Parent, E. 2017. Preliminary results from the groundfish and shrimp multidisciplinary survey in August 2016 in the Estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2017/002. v + 87 p. Supplemental Information The bottom dissolved oxygen is determined from a CTD profile in the water column according to AZMP sampling protocol: Mitchell, M. R., Harrison, G., Pauley, K., Gagné, A., Maillet, G., and Strain, P. 2002. Atlantic Zonal Monitoring Program sampling protocol. Can. Tech. Rep. Hydrogr. Ocean Sci. 223: iv + 23 pp.

  • Mean 2008 to 2017 summer surface conditions in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. Data come from the August and the September multidisciplinary surveys. Surface conditions are described by temperature, salinity and nutrient concentration (mmol/m³) interpolated on a 10 km x 10 km grid. Purpose Since 1990, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans has been conducting an annual multidisciplinary survey in the Estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence using a standardized protocol. In the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, these bottom trawl surveys has been carrying out each September since 1971. These missions are an important source of information about the status of the marine ressources. The objectives of the surveys are multiple: to estimate the abundance and biomass of groundfish and invertebrates, to identify the spatial distribution and biological characteristics of these species, to monitor the biodiversity of the Estuary and Gulf and finally, to describe the environmental conditions observed in the area at the moment of the sampling. The southern Gulf surveys are realized using the following standardized protocol: Hurlbut,T. and D.Clay (eds) 1990. Protocols for Research Vessel Cruises within the Gulf Region (Demersal Fish) (1970-1987). Can. MS Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. No. 2082: 143p. The sampling protocols used for the Estuary and northern Gulf surveys are described in details in the following publications: Bourdages, H., Archambault, D., Bernier, B., Fréchet, A., Gauthier, J., Grégoire, F., Lambert, J., et Savard, L. 2010. Résultats préliminaires du relevé multidisciplinaire de poissons de fond et de crevette d’août 2009 dans le nord du golfe du Saint-Laurent. Rapp. stat. can. sci. halieut. aquat. 1226 : xii+ 72 p. Bourdages, H., Archambault, D., Morin, B., Fréchet, A., Savard, L., Grégoire, F., et Bérubé, M. 2003. Résultats préliminaires du relevé multidisciplinaire de poissons de fond et de crevette d’août 2003 dans le nord du golfe du Saint-Laurent. Secr. can. consult. sci. du MPO. Doc. rech. 2003/078. vi + 68 p. Annual reports are available at the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS), (http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/index-eng.htm). Bourdages, H., Brassard, C., Desgagnés, M., Galbraith, P., Gauthier, J., Légaré, B., Nozères, C. and Parent, E. 2017. Preliminary results from the groundfish and shrimp multidisciplinary survey in August 2016 in the Estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2017/002. v + 87 p.