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  • Patterns of wet deposition of the nitrate/sulfate/ammonium ion across eastern Canada and the United States are based on measurements of precipitation depth and nitrate/sulfate/ammonium concentrations in precipitation samples. These measurements were collected and quality controlled by their respective networks: in Canada, the federal Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) and provincial or territorial networks in Alberta, New Brunswick, the Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. In the United States, wet deposition measurements were made by two coordinated networks: the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) / National Trends Network (NTN) and the NADP/Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN). Total annual deposition from each site was screened for completeness using the following criteria: (1) Precipitation amounts were recorded for >90% of the year and >60% of each quarter, and (2) a nitrate/sulfate/ammonium concentration was reported for >70% of the precipitation measured over the year and for >60% of each quarter. Only data from sites that had been designated as regionally representative were used in the mapping. Annual deposition amounts were interpolated using ordinary kriging using ArcMap Geostatistical Analyst. The map is limited to the contiguous U.S. and southeastern Canada because outside that region, the interpolation error exceeds 30% due to the larger distances between stations.

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    Natural Resources Canada commissioned a UNA (user needs assessment) study for the CGDI (Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure) to build upon previous work and understand the current requirements of Canadian CGDI users, including data users and suppliers, with special attention paid to the requirements of Indigenous organizations. In response to the findings of the Assessment, the CGDI analysis ready data ‘Starter Kits’ concept was established to help CGDI users to quickly get started and begin to obtain value out of geospatial datasets available through the CGDI. The curation of content and datasets addresses the common challenge faced by new users regarding which datasets to access and use to get started with GIS and the CGDI. The Open Government Portal has over 71,000 datasets under the “Nature and Environment” theme. This vast number of datasets provides a barrier to novice users when deciding which datasets they should use. Within the context of the CGDI, the data for the Starter Kits comes primarily from Federal and Provincial suppliers, e.g., Open Government of Canada and Provincial/Territorial agencies that are part of the Canadian Council on Geomatics. To embrace the benefits of the CGDI, where possible, datasets are integrated into the Starter Kits using spatial web services (e.g., WMS or WFS), to limit the size of the data package and ensure that users always have access to the latest data being provided by the supplier. For both the ArcGIS and QGIS Starter Kits, for several layers scale dependency is used so that detailed datasets only appear when the user zooms into the map to a certain scale in some cases. To generate the CGDI Starter Kit concept, four kits were developed organized into four areas or categories: British Columbia, Northwest Territories, Climate Change, and Water Resources. For BC and NWT, base datasets are grouped thematically as follows: Administrative Boundaries; Settlements; Hydrology; First Nations/Inuit; Protected Areas; Forestry; Land Cover/Land Use; Wildlife; Mining; Oil and Gas; Elevation; Infrastructure; Base imagery; For Climate Change and Water Resources, base datasets are grouped thematically as follows: Administrative Boundary; Natural Events; Settlements; Elevation and Hillshade; Infrastructure; Critical Habitat; Base imagery; Base hydrology. Additional select data sets focused on the themes of water resources and climate change are also compiled and included. Example datasets include: Groundwater (e.g., aquifer vulnerability): Marine (e.g., shoreline classification); Surface Water (e.g., National Hydro Network);Snow and Ice (e.g., permafrost) Water Quality (e.g., Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network -CABIN); Adjusted and Homogenized Canadian Climate Data (AHCCD); PRISM Data for BC (e.g., Precipitation, Max and Minimum Temperation); Climate Atlas of Canada; Arctic Ocean currents; Spatial distribution of hillslope thermokarst Agri-Environmental Indicator – AEI (e.g., Air Quality, GHG budget, etc.); Meteorological Service of Canada (e.g., Geospatial Web Services 2.8.0); Climate Normals 1981-2010; Adapt West Climate Adaptation Data. Each Starter Kit is “a start” and should not be considered a comprehensive compilation of geospatial data. Its purpose is to stimulate users to search for and obtain additional datasets as needed (supported using other recipes in the CGDI Cookbook).

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    Data provided shows grants and contributions provided to Canadian firms by National Research Council (NRC) and its Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) between April 1, 2019 and March 31, 2020.

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    FluWatchers is an online health surveillance system. It helps monitor the spread of flu-like illness across Canada. FluWatchers relies on Canadians to volunteer 15 seconds of their time each week to answer 2 questions about their health. To be a Fluwatcher, sign up at https://cnphi.canada.ca/fluWatcher/register Note: Only areas where there are five or more weekly reporters are included in the map. The reported rates of cough and fever are a reflection of the surveillance data available to FluWatch at the time of production. Delays in reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.

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    This interactive map is a collaborative project by the Geographical Names Board of Canada, illustrating a curated selection of places in Canada with names that have origins in multiple Indigenous languages. The names selected show the history and evolution of Indigenous place naming in Canada, from derived and inaccurate usage, to names provided by Indigenous organisations. Many Indigenous place names convey stories, knowledge, and descriptions of the land. By celebrating these names through this map, the Geographical Names Board of Canada hopes to increase the awareness of existing Indigenous place names and help promote the revitalization of Indigenous cultures and languages. Many more Indigenous place names exist in Canada and will be added in future releases of this map. If you would like to contribute names to this project, please contact the Geographical Names Board of Canada Secretariat at Natural Resources Canada.

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    Data provided shows grants and contributions provided to Canadian firms by National Research Council (NRC) and its Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019.

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    This interactive map commemorates Canada’s participation in armed conflicts at home and abroad by highlighting a sample of the many geographical features and places named for those that served our country. These commemorative geographical names help us remember war casualties, soldiers, sailors, airmen and airwomen, military leaders, and civilians recognized or decorated for outstanding acts of bravery and sacrifice in battle. These names also commemorate notable battles in which Canada participated, and Canadian military units, regiments, squadrons, and ships in which Canadians served. Federal, provincial and territorial members of the Geographical Names Board of Canada provided these commemorative names for the development of the map. Many more commemorative place names exist in Canada, and will be added in future releases of this evergreen interactive map. If you would like to contribute names to this project, please contact the Geographical Names Board of Canada Secretariat at Natural Resources Canada.

  • NHS as officially accepted by the Council of Ministers, mapping by Transport Canada.

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    Data provided shows grants and contributions provided to Canadian firms by National Research Council (NRC) and its Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) between April 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021.

  • The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) established a regulated area as part of its efforts to eradicate the Asian longhorned beetle (ALHB). With the regulation of this area, there are restrictions on the movement of nursery stock, trees, logs, lumber, wood, wood chips and bark chips from certain deciduous trees identified as hosts of the ALHB and firewood of all species. These restrictions are necessary to prevent the spread of the ALHB. This protects Canada's environment and forest resources, and also helps keep international markets open to the forest industry and nurseries in non-regulated parts of Ontario and in the rest of Canada.