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  • Patterns of wet deposition of the nitrate/sulfate/ammonium ion across eastern Canada and the United States are based on measurements of precipitation depth and nitrate/sulfate/ammonium concentrations in precipitation samples. These measurements were collected and quality controlled by their respective networks: in Canada, the federal Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) and provincial or territorial networks in Alberta, New Brunswick, the Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. In the United States, wet deposition measurements were made by two coordinated networks: the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) / National Trends Network (NTN) and the NADP/Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN). Total annual deposition from each site was screened for completeness using the following criteria: (1) Precipitation amounts were recorded for >90% of the year and >60% of each quarter, and (2) a nitrate/sulfate/ammonium concentration was reported for >70% of the precipitation measured over the year and for >60% of each quarter. Only data from sites that had been designated as regionally representative were used in the mapping. Annual deposition amounts were interpolated using ordinary kriging using ArcMap Geostatistical Analyst. The map is limited to the contiguous U.S. and southeastern Canada because outside that region, the interpolation error exceeds 30% due to the larger distances between stations.

  • Data provided shows grants and contributions provided to Canadian firms by National Research Council (NRC) and its Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019.

  • NHS as officially accepted by the Council of Ministers, mapping by Transport Canada.

  • Data provided shows grants and contributions provided to Canadian firms by National Research Council (NRC) and its Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) between April 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021.

  • FluWatchers is an online health surveillance system. It helps monitor the spread of flu-like illness across Canada. FluWatchers relies on Canadians to volunteer 15 seconds of their time each week to answer 2 questions about their health. To be a Fluwatcher, sign up at https://cnphi.canada.ca/fluWatcher/register Note: Only areas where there are five or more weekly reporters are included in the map. The reported rates of cough and fever are a reflection of the surveillance data available to FluWatch at the time of production. Delays in reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.

  • Data provided shows grants and contributions provided to Canadian firms by National Research Council (NRC) and its Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) between April 1, 2019 and March 31, 2020.

  • This interactive map is a collaborative project by the Geographical Names Board of Canada, illustrating a curated selection of places in Canada with names that have origins in multiple Indigenous languages. The names selected show the history and evolution of Indigenous place naming in Canada, from derived and inaccurate usage, to names provided by Indigenous organisations. Many Indigenous place names convey stories, knowledge, and descriptions of the land. By celebrating these names through this map, the Geographical Names Board of Canada hopes to increase the awareness of existing Indigenous place names and help promote the revitalization of Indigenous cultures and languages. Many more Indigenous place names exist in Canada and will be added in future releases of this map. If you would like to contribute names to this project, please contact the Geographical Names Board of Canada Secretariat at Natural Resources Canada.

  • This publication contains a raster maps at 250 m resolution of the merchantable volume (m3/ha) of the mature Canadian forest available for harvesting in the next 20 years (2011 to 2031). The maps were produced from remote sensing products at a spatial resolution of 250 m on the MODIS pixel grid and 30 m on the Landsat pixel grid. More specifically, we used forest attribute data at the 250 m pixel for the years 2001 and 2011 (Beaudoin et al 2014 and 2018) combined with forest cover changes for the years 1985 to 2015 at 30 m (Guindon et al. 2017 and 2018). The map of mature forests in Canada was prepared at the forest management unit (FMU) level and therefore exclude private lands. To be considered mature (i.e. available for cutting in the next 20 years), the forest pixels of Beaudoin et al. (2018) was to have a merchantable volume per ha equal to or greater than 80% of the average merchantable volume of the pixels that were harvested between 2001 and 2011 per forest management unit. A scientific article gives additional details on the methodology: Barrette J, Paré D, Manka F, Guindon L, Bernier P, Titus B. 2018. Forecasting the spatial distribution of logging residues in Canada’s managed forests. Can. J. For. Res. 48: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/10.1139/cjfr-2018-0080 Reference for this dataset: Barrette J, Paré D, Manka F, Guindon L, Bernier P, Titus B. 2018. Forecasting the spatial distribution of logging residues in Canada’s managed forests. Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, Quebec, Canada. https://doi.org/10.23687/dd94871a-9a20-47f5-825b-768518140f35

  • This dataset represents city, county, district, district municipality, municipality, regional municipality, town, township, and united county boundaries for the Emerald Ash Borer regulated areas of Canada.File naming convention:Three-letter Pest's scientific name + Geographic Area Abbreviation + Layer Content Abbreviation + Region. Example: aplCANregr == apl (Agrilus planipennis) + CAN (Canada) + reg (Regulated) + r (Region).

  • To slow the spread of the Brown spruce longhorn beetle to new areas, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) uses measures to control the movement of potentially infested materials. Slowing the spread of the Brown spruce longhorn beetle will protect Canada's environment and forest resources. It also helps keep international markets open to the forest industry and nurseries in non-regulated parts of Ontario and Quebec and in the rest of Canada.