Format

GeoTIF

125 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
status
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 125
  • High-resolution binary wetland map for Canada (2001-2016). Wetland map for the forested ecosystems of Canada focused on current conditions. The binary wetland data included in this product is national in scope (entirety of forested ecosystem) and represents the wall to wall characterization for 2001-2016 (see Wulder et al. 2018). This product was generated using both annual gap free composite reflectance images and annual forest change maps following the Virtual Land Cover Engine (VLCE) process (see Hermosilla et al. 2018), over the 650 million ha forested ecosystems of Canada. Elements of the VLCE classification approach are inclusion of disturbance information in the processes as well as ensuring class transitions over time are logical. Further, a Hidden Markov Model is implemented to assess individual year class likelihoods to reduce variability and possible noise in year-on-year class assignments (for instances when class likelihoods are similar). For this product, to be considered as currently a wetland a pixel must have been classified as wetland at least 80% or 13 of the 16 years between 2001 and 2016, inclusively. For an overview on the data, image processing, and time series change detection methods applied, see Wulder et al. (2018). Wulder, M.A., Z. Li, E. Campbell, J.C. White, G. Hobart, T. Hermosilla, and N.C. Coops (2018). A National Assessment of Wetland Status and Trends for Canada’s Forested Ecosystems Using 33 Years of Earth Observation Satellite Data. Remote Sensing. For a detailed description of the VLCE process and the subsequently generated land cover product, including an accuracy assessment, please see Hermosilla et al. (2018).

  • An accumulated value of heat degrees that the average temperature is above a specified threshold, 10°C for warm season crops. This condition must be maintained for at least 5 consecutive days in order for EGDD to be accumulated (egdd_warm). Week 1 and week 2 forecasted index is available daily from April 1 to October 31. Week 3 and week 4 forecasted index is available weekly (Thursday) from April 1 to October 31. Cumulative heat-energy satisfies the essential requirement of field crop growth and development towards a high yield and good quality of agricultural crop products. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have together developed a suite of extreme agrometeorological indices based on four main categories of weather factors: temperature, precipitation, heat, and wind. The extreme weather indices are intended as short-term prediction tools and generated using ECCC’s medium range forecasts to create a weekly index product on a daily and weekly basis.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • The raster maps depict a suite of forest attributes in 2001* and 2011 at 250 m by 250 m spatial resolution. The maps were produced using the k nearest neighbours method applied to MODIS imagery and trained from National Forest Inventory photo plot data. For detailed information about map production methods please refer to Beaudoin et al. (2018) "Tracking forest attributes across Canada between 2001 and 2011 using the k nearest neighbours mapping approach applied to MODIS imagery." Canadian Journal of Forest Research 48, 85-93. https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=38979 The map datasets may be downloaded from https://nfi.nfis.org/downloads/nfi_knn2011.zip or https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/ec9e2659-1c29-4ddb-87a2-6aced147a990 * Note: the forest composition (leading tree genus) map depicts forest attributes in 2001. How can this data be used? The resolution and accuracy of these map products are best suited for strategic-level forest reporting and informing policy and decision making at regional to national scales. As these maps also offer a coherent set of quantitative values for a large suite of forest attributes, they can be used as baseline information for modelling and in calculations such as merchantable forest volume or percentage of tree species. It is also possible to overlay these maps with other maps produced on the same pixel grid to make assessments of disturbance impacts, such as fire and harvests.

  • Fish Habitat Assessment Output: 5 of 16 High Water Level (75.4m ASL) - Juvenile/Adult Habitat - High Vegetation Association Species (All Thermal Guilds) Habitat suitability was assessed for the Bay of Quinte Area of Concern, at a 3 m grid resolution, using the Habitat Ecosystem Assessment Tool (HEAT), temperature algorithms, vegetation models, and water level input. Habitat classifications were based on three variables: depth (elevation), vegetation, and substrate; and modified by temperature suitabilities. The final suitability maps were based on documented habitat and temperature associations for the fish in the area. Different life stages (spawning requirements, nursery habitat, adult habitat) were modeled for the years of 1972-2011. Suitability values were scaled from 0 (not suitable) to 1 (highly suitable) and converted to suitability classes of very low, low, medium, and high. The final maps for each guild – life stage combination are maximum suitability values from the 39-year period modelled.