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FGDB/GDB

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  • Species At Risk Act (SARA) describes Critical Habitat (CH) as the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species (schedule 1), and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in a recovery strategy or in an action plan for the species. CH spatial data exists for 116 of the 469 Environment Canada – Species At Risk (EC SAR) of interest, which includes draft, candidate, proposed and final CH spatial data that were provided by CWS regional offices. In order to protect sensitive CH information, or for some sharing data issues, CH sites were generalized using a 10km x 10km national grid. As mentioned before, each region provides NCR-CWS with their CH spatial data. After the generalization process, all results were merged to constitute the national view.

  • This dataset consists of a set of polygons that represent the drainage areas of active discharge stations within the Mississippi River Drainage Area. In partnership with the provinces, territories and other agencies, the Water Survey of Canada (WSC) operates a network of over 2600 active hydrometric gauges across the country. The NHS Basin Polygon dataset is compilation of datasets collected from a number of contributing agencies, including provinces, territories and other government departments. Environment and Climate Change Canada staff in a number of offices across the country is also responsible for the derivation of large parts of the dataset. Users should be aware that drainage areas derived from these polygons may differ from official drainage areas of hydrometric stations published by WSC.

  • This dataset consists of a set of polygons that represent the drainage areas of active discharge stations within the Arctic Drainage Area. In partnership with the provinces, territories and other agencies, the Water Survey of Canada (WSC) operates a network of over 2600 active hydrometric gauges across the country. The NHS Basin Polygon dataset is compilation of datasets collected from a number of contributing agencies, including provinces, territories and other government departments. Environment and Climate Change Canada staff in a number of offices across the country is also responsible for the derivation of large parts of the dataset. Users should be aware that drainage areas derived from these polygons may differ from official drainage areas of hydrometric stations published by WSC.

  • This dataset consists of a set of polygons that represent the drainage areas of active discharge stations within the Pacific Drainage Area. In partnership with the provinces, territories and other agencies, the Water Survey of Canada (WSC) operates a network of over 2600 active hydrometric gauges across the country. The NHS Basin Polygon dataset is compilation of datasets collected from a number of contributing agencies, including provinces, territories and other government departments. Environment and Climate Change Canada staff in a number of offices across the country is also responsible for the derivation of large parts of the dataset. Users should be aware that drainage areas derived from these polygons may differ from official drainage areas of hydrometric stations published by WSC.

  • This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database and it covers various locations across the Canadian Arctic i.e. James Bay, Resolute Bay and the south coast of Devon Island, the south-west coast of Hudson Bay, Labrador Coast, Victoria Strait, Beaufort Sea, and the North-east coast of Baffin Island. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone. This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where the treatment or cleanup activities take place. The basic parameter that defines the shoreline type is the material that is present in the intertidal zone. The presence or absence of sediments is a key factor in determining whether oil is stranded on the surface of a substrate or can penetrate and/or be buried. This dataset contains thousands of linear shoreline segments ranging in length from 200 m and 2 km long. The entities represent the location of the segments and their geomorphological description. There exist further fields in the attribute table for this dataset. We are currently working on standardizing our shoreline segmentation datasets and the updated data will soon be uploaded to the catalog. Sergy, G. (2008). The Shoreline Classification Scheme for SCAT and Oil Spill Response in Canada. Proceedings of the 31stArctic and Marine Oil Spill Program Technical Seminar.Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, Pp. 811-819.

  • This dataset consists of a set of polygons that represent the drainage areas of active discharge stations within the Northern Quebec and Labrador Drainage Area. In partnership with the provinces, territories and other agencies, the Water Survey of Canada (WSC) operates a network of over 2600 active hydrometric gauges across the country. The NHS Basin Polygon dataset is compilation of datasets collected from a number of contributing agencies, including provinces, territories and other government departments. Environment and Climate Change Canada staff in a number of offices across the country is also responsible for the derivation of large parts of the dataset. Users should be aware that drainage areas derived from these polygons may differ from official drainage areas of hydrometric stations published by WSC.

  • This dataset consists of a set of polygons that represent the drainage areas of active discharge stations within the Nelson River Drainage Area. In partnership with the provinces, territories and other agencies, the Water Survey of Canada (WSC) operates a network of over 2600 active hydrometric gauges across the country. The NHS Basin Polygon dataset is compilation of datasets collected from a number of contributing agencies, including provinces, territories and other government departments. Environment and Climate Change Canada staff in a number of offices across the country is also responsible for the derivation of large parts of the dataset. Users should be aware that drainage areas derived from these polygons may differ from official drainage areas of hydrometric stations published by WSC.

  • This national dataset contains geographic range data for 488 Species at risk based on NatureServe data, SAR recovery strategies, Environment Canada resources and COSEWIC status reports.

  • As part of the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007'08 and 2008'09 activities, and related objectives of the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW), nations of the circumpolar Arctic have co-operated to produce a new bedrock geology map and related digital map database at a scale of 1:5 000 000. The map, released in north polar stereographic projection using the World Geodetic System (WGS) 84 datum, includes complete geological and physiographic coverage of all onshore and offshore bedrock areas north of latitude 60° north.

  • As part of a scientific assessment of critical habitat for boreal woodland caribou (Environment Canada 2011, see full reference in accompanying documentation), Environment Canada's Landscape Science and Technology Division was tasked with providing detailed anthropogenic disturbance mapping, across known caribou ranges, as of 2015. This data comprises a 5-year update to the mapping of 2008-2010 disturbances, and allows researchers to better understand the attributes that have a known effect on caribou population persistence. The original disturbance mapping was based on 30-metre resolution Landsat-5 imagery from 2008 -2010. The mapping process used in 2010 was repeated using 2015 Landsat imagery to create a nationally consistent, reliable and repeatable geospatial dataset that followed a common methodology. The methods developed were focused on mapping disturbances at a specific point of time, and were not designed to identify the age of disturbances, which can be of particular interest for disturbances that can be considered non-permanent, for example cutblocks. The resultant datasets were used for a caribou resource selection function (habitat modeling) and to assess overall disturbance levels on each caribou ranges. Anthropogenic disturbances within 51 caribou ranges across Canada were mapped. The ranges were defined by individual provinces and territories across Canada. Disturbances were remapped across these ranges using 2015 Landsat-8 satellite imagery to provide the most up-to-date data possible. As with the 2010 mapping project, anthropogenic disturbance was defined as any human-caused disturbance to the natural landscape that could be visually identified from Landsat imagery with 30-metre multi-band imagery at a viewing scale of 1:50,000. A minimum mapping unit MMU of 2 ha (approximately 22 contiguous 30-metre pixels) was selected. Each disturbance feature type was represented in the database by a line or polygon depending on their geometric description. Polygonal disturbances included: cutblocks, mines, reservoirs, built-up areas, well sites, agriculture, oil and gas facilities, as well as unknown features. Linear disturbances included: roads, railways, powerlines, seismic exploration lines, pipelines, dams, air strips, as well as unknown features. For each type of anthropogenic disturbance, a clear description was established (see Appendix 7.2 of the science assessment) to maintain consistency in identifying the various disturbances in the imagery by the different interpreters. Features were only digitized if they were visible in the Landsat imagery at the prescribed viewing scale. A 2nd interpreter quality-control phase was carried out to ensure high quality, complete and consistent data collection. For this 2015 update an additional, separate higher-resolution database was created by repeating the process using 15-metre panchromatic imagery. For the 30-metre database only, the line and poly data were buffered by a 500-metre radius, representing their extended zone of impact upon boreal caribou herds. Additionally, forest fire polygons were merged into the anthropogenic footprint in order to create an overall disturbance footprint. These buffered datasets were used in the calculation of range disturbance levels and for integrated risk assessment analysis.