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GPKG

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  • Produced as part of the St. Lawrence Action Plan, the Atlas of Areas of Conservation Interest in the St. Lawrence Lowlands presents the sites where conservation needs are most acute. Conservation targets (coarse filter) are forest, wetlands, open habitats (wildlands, perennial crops) and aquatic environments, with fine-filter elements such as exceptional aquatic environments associated with the St. Lawrence Corridor (e.g. spawning grounds), alvar, bird colonies, wildlife features (e.g., nesting sites of Shore Swallow and Chimney Swift, etc.) and significant floristic occurrences. Our goal is to identify sites of interest until a 20% representativeness threshold is reached. Geospatial data associated with conservation sites of interest, user guide, methodological report, metadata, and detailed land-use mapping of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, which was an essential baseline for producing this atlas, are available for download. Users can therefore more accurately view the spatial distribution of sites of interest and the conservation value associated with each habitat parcel of conservation targets (forest, wetland, wildland, perennial crops, aquatic environments) through geographic information systems (e.g., ArcGIS). Users can also adapt the analysis of these data to their territorial reality and to specific objectives specific to their interests. The conservation of natural environments and species in precarious situations is a shared responsibility, and this Atlas will help meet the priorities of the many organizations involved in the conservation of natural environments in the St. Lawrence Lowlands. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • The aim of these projects was to create a realistic and concrete picture of the groundwater resources of the municipal territories of southern Quebec in order to protect and ensure their sustainability. For more information, consult the Groundwater Knowledge Acquisition Projects page on the website of the Ministry of the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • "Vegetation Zones of Canada: a Biogeoclimatic Perspective" maps Canadian geography in relation to gradients of regional climate, as expressed by potential vegetation on zonal sites. Compared to previous similar national-scale products, "Vegetation Zones of Canada" benefits from the work of provincial and territorial ecological classification programs over the last 30+ years, incorporating this regional knowledge of ecologically significant climatic gradients into a harmonized national map. This new map, reflecting vegetation and soils adapted to climates prior to approximately 1960, can serve as a broad-scale (approximately 1:5 M to 1:10 M) geospatial reference for monitoring and modeling effects of climate changes on Canadian ecosystems. "Vegetation Zones of Canada: a Biogeoclimatic Perspective" employs a two-level hierarchical legend. Level 1 vegetation zones reflect the global-scale latitudinal gradient of annual net radiation, as well as the effects high elevation and west to east climatic and biogeographic variation across Canada. Within the level 1 vegetation zones, level 2 zones distinguish finer scale variation in zonal vegetation, especially in response to elevational and arctic climatic gradients, climate-related floristics and physiognomic diversity in the Great Plains, and maritime climatic influences on the east and west coasts. Thirty-three level 2 vegetation zones are recognized: High Arctic Sparse Tundra Mid-Arctic Dwarf Shrub Tundra Low Arctic Shrub Tundra Subarctic Alpine Tundra Western Boreal Alpine Tundra Cordilleran Alpine Tundra Pacific Alpine Tundra Eastern Alpine Tundra Subarctic Woodland-Tundra Northern Boreal Woodland Northwestern Boreal Forest West-Central Boreal Forest Eastern Boreal Forest Atlantic Maritime Heathland Pacific Maritime Rainforest Pacific Dry Forest Pacific Montane Forest Cordilleran Subboreal Forest Cordilleran Montane Forest Cordilleran Rainforest Cordilleran Dry Forest Eastern Temperate Mixed Forest Eastern Temperate Deciduous Forest Acadian Temperate Forest Rocky Mountains Foothills Parkland Great Plains Parkland Intermontane Shrub-Steppe Rocky Mountains Foothills Fescue Grassland Great Plains Fescue Grassland Great Plains Mixedgrass Grassland Central Tallgrass Grassland Cypress Hills Glaciers Please cite this dataset as: Baldwin, K.; Allen, L.; Basquill, S.; Chapman, K.; Downing, D.; Flynn, N.; MacKenzie, W.; Major, M.; Meades, W.; Meidinger, D.; Morneau, C.; Saucier, J-P.; Thorpe, J.; Uhlig, P. 2019. Vegetation Zones of Canada: a Biogeoclimatic Perspective. [Map] Scale 1:5,000,000. Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service. Great Lake Forestry Center, Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada.

  • This thematic layer presents the location of pesticide stations in surface waters monitored in various studies. The data come from an extract from the BQMA and, when a report is available on the Department's Internet site, the reader can access it from a link in the information window. The surface water pesticide monitoring dataset also includes a layer of sampling stations, a layer of polygons showing the drainage areas of some of the stations, and a data table containing the compilation of land use per year for each of these drainage areas. The drainage areas and the land use table are linked to the sampling stations from the BQMA station number. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • Geoscientific work **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • The Aquatic Uses Database (URMA) is a database of information on water-related activities collected by representatives of the State of the Environment Monitoring Directorate (DSEE) of the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MELCC) and watershed organizations responsible for the implementation of integrated water management at the watershed level. Uses related to the aquatic environment can be classified into four broad categories: uses in riparian recreational areas, uses involving indirect contact with water, uses involving direct contact with water, and uses of water withdrawal. Please refer to the Glossary of Aquatic Uses for a description of each of the uses listed in the URMA Bank. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • This thematic layer presents the location of wells sampled for pesticides in various studies conducted near selected crop media targeted between 1999 and 2019. The data comes from an extract from the BQMA and, when a report is available on the Department's Internet site, it can be accessed by the reader from a link in the information window. Private well sampling stations are grouped by watershed to comply with sections 53 and 54 of the Act respecting access to documents held by public bodies and the protection of personal information. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • Benthos monitoring aims to determine the status of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in the river, depending on the composition of the substrate and the type of flow. Information on benthic macroinvertebrate samples taken from benthos monitoring stations is classified according to the benthos health index: iSbG for coarse-substrate streams and iSBM for soft-substrate streams. The benthos health index (ISB) is a multimetric index based on benthic macroinvertebrates that assesses the biotic integrity of shallow rivers. The benthos tracking dataset includes a layer of sampling stations, a layer of polygons presenting drainage areas at some of the stations, and a data table comprising the compilation of land use by year for each of these drainage areas. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • The Wildlife Habitat Geodatabase (HAFA) contains data for the 11 legal wildlife habitats located on Crown lands that meet the definition of the Wildlife Habitat Regulations (WHR). HAFAs are also found on mixed and private lands for information purposes. __Warning: The digital version of the geo-descriptive data describing wildlife habitats is produced from a legal perspective of habitat location, protection and management. Indeed, only the digital version that was published in the Gazette officielle du Québec.__ The last publication of wildlife habitats is recognized as legal: May 27, 2015. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • Provincial layer representing the administrative subdivision of Quebec territory for the purposes of government forest management. Quebec has 33 field units comprising public territories, including planning units and private territories. Each field unit ensures compliance with the legal and regulatory framework, provides services to citizens and implements departmental programs. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**