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  • This group of maps, which includes the CanMatrix and CanTopo collections, is now a legacy product that is no longer maintained. It may not meet current government standards. Natural Resources Canada's (NRCan) topographic raster maps provide a representation of the topographic phenomena of the Canadian landmass. Several editions of paper maps have been produced over time in order to offer improved products compared to their predecessors in terms of quality and the most up to date information possible. The georeferenced maps can be used in a Geographic Information System (GIS). In all cases, they accurately represent the topographical data available for the date indicated (validity date). The combination of CanMatrix and CanTopo data provides complete national coverage. • CanMatrix - Print Ready: Raster maps produced by scanning topographic maps at scales from 1:25 000 to 1:1 000 000. This product is not georeferenced. Validity dates: 1944 to 2005 (1980 on average). Available formats: PDF and TIFF • CanMatrix - Georeferenced: Raster maps produced by scanning topographic maps at scales of 1:50 000 and 1:250 000. These maps are georeferenced according to the 1983 North American Reference System (NAD 83). Validity dates: 1944 to 2005 (1980 on average). Available format: GeoTIFF • CanTopo: Digital raster maps produced mainly from the GeoBase initiative, NRCan digital topographic data, and other sources. Approximately 2,234 datasets (maps) at scale of 1:50 000, primarily covering northern Canada, are available. CanTopo datasets in GeoPDF and GeoTIFF format are georeferenced according to the 1983 North American Reference System (NAD 83). Validity dates: 1946 to 2012 (2007 on average). Available formats: PDF, GeoPDF, TIFF and GeoTIFF

  • Appendix 11. Taxa of hetorotrophic protists reported from Foxe Basin, Canada (FB), Disko Bay, W Greenland (DB; Vors 1993), the Greenland Sea (GLS; Ikävalko & Gradinger 1997) and Northern Baffin Bay, Canada (NBB; Lovejoy et al. 2002).

  • Appendix 17.3. Phylogeographic and population genetics studies of selected Arctic species.

  • Appendix 20. Arctic indigenous languages status and trends. Data used to compile the information for the table was collected from both census records and academic sources, each of the CAFF countries and indigenous peoples organizations (Permanent Participants to the Arctic Council) where possible also provided statistical information.

  • Appendix 9.3 Borderline vascular plant species (“b”) with indication of PAF code number, reaching the southernmost part of the Arctic subzone E. Arctic floristic provinces, subzones (A-E), neighbouring boreal or boreo-alpine zone (N) derived from Elven (2007).

  • Appendix 17.2. Cryptic speciation in selected Arctic terrestrial and marine species.

  • Appenidx 17.1. Selected phylogenetic studies of (or including) Arctic taxa.

  • Appendix 9.8 The thirty moss families of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago with reference number (Ireland et al. 1987) in brackets. Number of species in each family, number of genus in family, and number of species in each genus are given. Species-rich genera and families are highlighted in grey.

  • Appendix 6.1.1. Freshwater and diadromous fish species by area of occurrence within the High Arctic, Low Arctic and sub-Arctic. Appendix 6.1.2. Freshwater and diadromous fishes of the Palearctic and Nearctic regions. Appendix 6.1.3. Occurrence of freshwater and diadromous fishes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of the seven geographical regions referred to in the main text. Appendix 6.1.4. Freshwater and diadromous fish species status summary for species assessed at some level of risk by country or region

  • Appendix 10.2. Data on diversity of lichens and lichenicolous fungi in the Arctic and separately for the sectors of the Arctic (Beringia, Canada, North Atlantic, European Russia, W and E Siberia) and the single floristic provinces: numbers of species, numbers of species in the low and high Arctic, percentage of species with respective growth form (crustose, squamulose, foliose, fruticose), the estimated number of missing crustose lichen species (explanations below), percentage of species on the respective substrate on which the lichen species grow, and rarity of species within and outside the Arctic.