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  • RADARSAT-1, in operation from 1995 to 2013, is Canada's first earth observation satellite. Developed and operated by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), it has provided essential information to government, scientists and commercial users. Ultimately, the RADARSAT-1 mission generated the largest synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data archive in the world. In April 2019, 36,000 images were made accessible through the Earth Observation Data Management System (eodms-sgdot.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca). A heatmap of processed images was produced by the CSA and helps visualize the density of images available by mapped sector during the RADARSAT-1 mission.

  • In 2015, the Earth Observation Team of the Science and Technology Branch (STB) at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) repeated the process of generating annual crop inventory digital maps using satellite imagery to for all of Canada, in support of a national crop inventory. A Decision Tree (DT) based methodology was applied using optical (Landsat-8) and radar (RADARSAT-2) based satellite images, and having a final spatial resolution of 30m. In conjunction with satellite acquisitions, ground-truth information was provided by provincial crop insurance companies and point observations from the BC Ministry of Agriculture and our regional AAFC colleagues.

  • Forests cover large areas of Canada but only some of these forests are actively managed. The Map of Forest Management in Canada, 2017 version, provides a generalized classification of forest management in Canada, including: protected areas, Treaty/Settlement Lands (including Treaty Lands identified in Final Agreements, Land Claim Agreements and Settlements), Indian Reserves, other federal reserves (including military training areas), provincial and territorial reserves and restricted use areas, private lands, short- and long-term Crown forest tenure areas and areas with no current Crown timber dispositions. The Managed Forest Map of Canada dataset provides a wall-to-wall classification of lands in Canada. It does not differentiate areas of forest from non-forest. The Managed Forest Map of Canada differs from maps defining the area designated as “managed forest” for greenhouse gas inventory reporting purposes and does not replace those maps. Instead, the Managed Forest Map of Canada shows areas that are currently managed, as of June 2017, and provides generalized management type classification for those areas. Collaborating agencies plan to update the dataset periodically as needed, and remain open to receiving advice from experts concerning refinement priorities for future versions.

  • This dataset represents city, county, district, district municipality, municipality, regional municipality, town, township, and united county boundaries for the Emerald Ash Borer regulated areas of Canada.File naming convention:Three-letter Pest's scientific name + Geographic Area Abbreviation + Layer Content Abbreviation + Region. Example: aplCANregr == apl (Agrilus planipennis) + CAN (Canada) + reg (Regulated) + r (Region).

  • To slow the spread of the Brown spruce longhorn beetle to new areas, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) uses measures to control the movement of potentially infested materials. Slowing the spread of the Brown spruce longhorn beetle will protect Canada's environment and forest resources. It also helps keep international markets open to the forest industry and nurseries in non-regulated parts of Ontario and Quebec and in the rest of Canada.

  • To slow the spread of the Hemlock woolly adelgid to new areas, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) uses measures to control the movement of potentially infested materials. Slowing the spread of HWA will protect Canada's environment and forest resources. It also helps keep international markets open to the forest industry and nurseries in non-regulated parts of Nova Scotia and in non-regulated parts of Canada.

  • The toponymic features of the CanVec series include proper nouns designating places and representations of the territory. This data come from provincial, territorial and Canadian toponymic databases. They are used in the CanVec Series for cartographic reference purposes and vary according to the scale of display. The toponymic features of the CanVec series can differ from the Canada's official geographical names. The CanVec multiscale series is available as prepackaged downloadable files and by user-defined extent via a Geospatial data extraction tool. Related Products: [Topographic Data of Canada - CanVec Series](https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/8ba2aa2a-7bb9-4448-b4d7-f164409fe056) Users can obtain information about Canada's official toponyms at: **[Geographical names in Canada](https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/maps-tools-publications/maps/geographical-names-canada/10786)**

  • This historical map series consists of the Alberta Resource Atlas series of standard page-sized maps outlining various geographical, cultural, and economic characteristics of Alberta. The series is categorized by the following themes: Administrative Regions, Agricultural Processing and Manufacturing, Agricultural Production, Natural Resources, Physical Features, Population, and Service and Recreational Facilities.This product can be viewed on a computer, printed or be plotted in part or in whole. This series is not updated and contains a range of publication dates.

  • In 2011, the Earth Observation Team of the Science and Technology Branch (STB) at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) expanded the process of generating annual crop inventory digital maps using satellite imagery to include British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime provinces, in support of a national crop inventory. A Decision Tree (DT) based methodology was applied using optical (Landsat-5, DMC) and radar (RADARSAT-2) based satellite images, and having a final spatial resolution of 30m. In conjunction with satellite acquisitions, ground-truth information was provided by provincial crop insurance companies and point observations from our regional AAFC colleagues.