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Water

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  • The “Agri-Environmental Indicator (AEI) - Risk of Wind Erosion on Cultivated Land - 2011” dataset provides the estimated rate of soil loss from wind for Soil Landscapes of Canada agricultural areas for census years from 1981 to 2011.

  • This product provides the variability index for selected drainage regions in Canada. Variability is measured using a coefficient of variation (CV) to compare all months over a 42-year time period and is a measure of the dispersion or variation in the monthly yield values from 1971 to 2013 (and 1971 to 2012 for drainage region 1). It is defined as the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean or the standard deviation divided by the mean, with higher CVs indicating more variability in monthly water yields. The monthly variability was not calculated for drainage regions 5, 7, 8, 16, 17, 18, or the Labrador portion of 25.

  • This product provides runoff data with each contour line corresponding to an average amount of annual runoff (in millimeters). Runoff data were derived from discharge values from hydrometric stations with natural flows. Not all years are included for every region of the country due to data quality and availability issues. Data cover the period 1971 to 2013 for the south and 1971 to 2004 for the north. These files were produced by Statistics Canada, Environment, Energy and Transportation Statistics Division, 2017, based on data from Environment and Climate Change Canada, 2015, Water Survey of Canada, Archived Hydrometric Data (HYDAT), www.ec.gc.ca/rhc- wsc/default.asp?lang=En&n=4EED50F1-1 (accessed December 3, 2015); Spence, C. and A. Burke, 2008, “Estimates of Canadian Arctic Archipelago runoff from observed hydrometric data,” Journal of Hydrology, Vol. 362, pp. 247–259. For more information about methods, results and limitations see Appendix D in Statistics Canada, 2017, “Freshwater in Canada,” Human Activity and the Environment, Catalogue no. 16-201-X. The purpose of the dataset is to present runoff values as derived from Statistics Canada's Water Yield Model on a national scale map of 1:32,000,000. This product is intended to be used for reference or mapping purposes. The product ends at the shoreline of Canada as defined by the drainage region boundaries supplied for drainage regions of Canada. It does not include the Arctic Islands.

  • The “AAFC Annual Unit Runoff in Canada - 2013” data series illustrates runoff trends across the country by isolines of annual unit runoff for a variety of probabilities of exceedence commonly used by decision makers Annual unit runoff is a measure of runoff volume per square kilometre. This series uses units of cubic decametres (1000 m3) per square kilometre (dam3/km2), which is equivalent to millimetres depth on the landscape. It includes a point data set for the hydrologic stations that were analyzed and seven sets of line work to show the adjusted isolines for 10%, 25%, 50%, 70%, 75%, 80%, and 90% probability of exceedence.

  • Mapping of open-air rivers located within the islands of the Lavallois territory. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • This set presents the location of rain gauges, meteorological instruments designed to measure the amount of precipitation fallen over a given time interval at a specific location, within the territory of the City of Montreal. **This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**

  • The “Hydrometric Gauging Station Network of the AAFC Watersheds Project - 2013” dataset is a geospatial data layer containing network line features representing links between hydrometric gauging stations of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Watersheds Project. Each line connects a gauging station to its downstream neighbour(s), indicating its drainage direction. This network is a ‘drainage’ network, not a ‘stream’ network. That is, the lines do not in any way portray the actual stream path between stations. In some instances, a lake, for example, an area may have several gauging stations. In such cases, one of the gauging stations is designated the ‘primary’ gauging station for calculation purposes, and to maintain proper hydraulic relationships between gauging stations, where only the primary stations are connected to the downstream portion of the network.

  • The “Gross and Effective Drainage Areas for Hydrometric Gauging Stations of the AAFC Watersheds Project - 2013” dataset is a table that provides the calculated gross and effective drainage areas associated with the hydrometric gauging stations of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Watersheds Project. Areas are provided in square kilometres. ‘Gross drainage’ describes the total area of a catchment. ‘Effective drainage’ describes areas that are expected to contribute to an average runoff.

  • The “Incremental Gross Drainage Areas of the AAFC Watersheds Project - 2013” dataset is a geospatial data layer containing polygon features representing the incremental gross drainage areas of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Watersheds Project. The Project area is subdivided by hydrometric gauging station. The maximum area that could contribute runoff to each station, less that of its upstream neighbour(s) is called an ‘incremental gross drainage area’.

  • The "Total Effective Drainage Areas of the AAFC Watersheds Project – 2013” dataset is a geospatial data layer containing polygon features representing the areas within the “total gross drainage areas” of each hydrometric gauging station of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Watersheds Project that would contribute to average runoff. A ‘total gross drainage area’ is the maximum area that could contribute runoff for a single gauging station – the ‘total effective drainage areas’ are those parts of that ‘total gross drainage area’ that would contribute surface runoff to an average runoff. For each “total gross drainage area” there can be only one “total effective drainage areas”. These polygons may overlap with those from other gauging stations’ “total gross drainage area”, as upstream land surfaces form part of multiple downstream gauging stations’ “total gross drainage areas”.