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  • This service shows the median household after-tax income in 2015 for Canada, by 2016 census subdivision. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. After-tax income - refers to total income less income taxes of the statistical unit during a specified reference period (for additional information refer to Total Income – 2016 Census Dictionary and After-tax Income – 2016 Census Dictionary). The median income of a specified group is the amount that divides the income distribution of that group into two halves. Census subdivision (CSD) is the general term for municipalities (as determined by provincial/territorial legislation) or areas treated as municipal equivalents for statistical purposes (e.g., Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories). Municipal status is defined by laws in effect in each province and territory in Canada. To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census subdivision” web service, accessible in the data resources section below. Besides the variable described here, the dataset contains the id, name, type, province, population, land area and the number of private households for each census subdivision. If a value is null, it could be because it is not available for a specific reference period, it is not applicable, it is too unreliable to be published or it is suppressed to meet confidentiality requirements of the Statistics Act. To find out the exact reason, refer to the source data from Census in the resources below.

  • This service shows the median household after-tax income in 2015 for Canada, by 2016 census division. The data is from the Census Profile, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-316-X2016001. After-tax income - refers to total income less income taxes of the statistical unit during a specified reference period (for additional information refer to Total Income – 2016 Census Dictionary and After-tax Income – 2016 Census Dictionary). The median income of a specified group is the amount that divides the income distribution of that group into two halves. Census division (CD) is the general term for provincially legislated areas (such as county, municipalité régionale de comté and regional district) or their equivalents. In other provinces and the territories where laws do not provide for such areas, Statistics Canada defines equivalent areas for statistical reporting purposes in cooperation with these provinces and territories. Census divisions are intermediate geographic areas between the province/territory level and the municipality (census subdivision). To have a cartographic representation of the ecumene with this socio-economic indicator, it is recommended to add as the first layer, the “NRCan - 2016 population ecumene by census division” web service, accessible in the data resources section below. Besides the variable described here, the dataset contains the id, name, type, province, population, land area and the number of private households for each census division.

  • Short and long term drinking water advisories that are in place in First Nation communities on reserve located in Canada. Drinking water advisories are preventive measures put in place to protect public health from drinking water that could be contaminated. In a First Nation community, a drinking water advisory can affect as little as one building and does not always represent a community-wide drinking water problem. Drinking water advisories are put in place for various reasons. For instance, a community may issue an advisory if there are problems in the overall water system, such as line breaks, equipment failure, or poor filtration/disinfection during water treatment. Communities may also choose to issue a drinking water advisory as a precautionary measure, such as when there are emergency repairs in the water distribution system or if a community does not have a trained Water System Operator or Community-based Drinking Water Quality Monitor in place.

  • The fire regime describes the patterns of fire seasonality, frequency, size, spatial continuity, intensity, type (e.g., crown or surface fire) and severity in a particular area or ecosystem. Annual area burned is the average surface area burned annually in Canada by large fires (greater than 200 hectares (ha)). Changes in annual area burned were estimated using Homogeneous Fire Regime (HFR) zones. These zones represent areas where the fire regime is similar over a broad spatial scale (Boulanger et al. 2014). Such zonation is useful in identifying areas with unusual fire regimes that would have been overlooked if fires had been aggregated according to administrative and/or ecological classifications. Fire data comes from the Canadian National Fire Database covering 1959–1999 (for HFR zones building) and 1959-1995 (for model building). Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) modeling was used to relate monthly fire regime attributes with monthly climatic/fire-weather in each HFR zone. Future climatic data were simulated using the Canadian Earth System Model version 2 (CanESM2) and downscaled at a 10 Km resolution using ANUSPLIN for two different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). RCPs are different greenhouse gas concentration trajectories adopted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for its fifth Assessment Report. RCP 2.6 (referred to as rapid emissions reductions) assumes that greenhouse gas concentrations peak between 2010-2020, with emissions declining thereafter. In the RCP 8.5 scenario (referred to as continued emissions increases) greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise throughout the 21st century. Provided layer: projected annual area burned by large fires (>200 ha) across Canada for the short-term (2011-2040) under the RCP 8.5 (continued emissions increases). Reference: Boulanger, Y., Gauthier, S., et al. 2014. A refinement of models projecting future Canadian fire regimes using homogeneous fire regime zones. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 44, 365–376.

  • The fire regime describes the patterns of fire seasonality, frequency, size, spatial continuity, intensity, type (e.g., crown or surface fire) and severity in a particular area or ecosystem. Annual area burned is the average surface area burned annually in Canada by large fires (greater than 200 hectares (ha)). Changes in annual area burned were estimated using Homogeneous Fire Regime (HFR) zones. These zones represent areas where the fire regime is similar over a broad spatial scale (Boulanger et al. 2014). Such zonation is useful in identifying areas with unusual fire regimes that would have been overlooked if fires had been aggregated according to administrative and/or ecological classifications. Fire data comes from the Canadian National Fire Database covering 1959–1999 (for HFR zones building) and 1959-1995 (for model building). Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) modeling was used to relate monthly fire regime attributes with monthly climatic/fire-weather in each HFR zone. Future climatic data were simulated using the Canadian Earth System Model version 2 (CanESM2) and downscaled at a 10 Km resolution using ANUSPLIN for two different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). RCPs are different greenhouse gas concentration trajectories adopted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for its fifth Assessment Report. RCP 2.6 (referred to as rapid emissions reductions) assumes that greenhouse gas concentrations peak between 2010-2020, with emissions declining thereafter. In the RCP 8.5 scenario (referred to as continued emissions increases) greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise throughout the 21st century. Provided layer: projected annual area burned by large fires (>200 ha) across Canada for the medium-term (2041-2070) under the RCP 8.5 (continued emissions increases). Reference: Boulanger, Y., Gauthier, S., et al. 2014. A refinement of models projecting future Canadian fire regimes using homogeneous fire regime zones. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 44, 365–376.

  • Historical earthquakes recorded by Earthquakes Canada. This dataset contains the earthquakes recorded in decade 2000. However, the National Earthquake Database makes available seismic bulletin data from 1985 and onward. For a complete listing of current and historical earthquakes, visit http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/.

  • A federal electoral district is an area represented by a member of the House of Commons. The Federal Electoral Districts (FED) dataset is a digital representation of the 338 electoral districts proclaimed by the Representation Order of 2013. This dataset is an update of the 2013 Federal Electoral Districts (FED) 2013.

  • Historical earthquakes recorded by Earthquakes Canada. This dataset contains the earthquakes recorded in decade 2010. However, the National Earthquake Database makes available seismic bulletin data from 1985 and onward. For a complete listing of current and historical earthquakes, visit http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/.

  • Historical earthquakes recorded by Earthquakes Canada. This dataset contains the earthquakes recorded in decade 1980. However, the National Earthquake Database makes available seismic bulletin data from 1985 and onward. For a complete listing of current and historical earthquakes, visit http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/.

  • Historical earthquakes recorded by Earthquakes Canada. This dataset contains the earthquakes recorded in decade 1990. However, the National Earthquake Database makes available seismic bulletin data from 1985 and onward. For a complete listing of current and historical earthquakes, visit http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/.