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biota

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  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • This dataset displays the geographic areas within which critical habitat for terrestrial species at risk, listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA), occurs in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Note that this includes only terrestrial species and species for which Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead. However, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. To precisely define what constitutes critical habitat for a particular species it is essential that this geo-spatial information be considered in conjunction with the information provided in a species’ recovery document. Recovery documents are available from the Species at Risk (SAR) Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca). The recovery documents contain important information about the interpretation of the geo-spatial information, especially regarding the biological and environmental features (“biophysical attributes”) that complete the definition of a species’ critical habitat. Each species’ dataset is part of a larger collection of critical habitat data for all terrestrial species in Atlantic Canada that is available for download. The collection includes critical habitat as it is depicted in final recovery documents. It is important to note that recovery documents, and therefore critical habitat, may be amended from time to time. Also, new species can be added to Schedule 1 of SARA and thus new critical habitat described when additional recovery documents are posted on the SAR Public Registry. As critical habitat is amended, this dataset will be updated; however the SAR Public Registry (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca) should always be considered the definitive source for critical habitat information. In cases where the data is sensitive (e.g. some turtle species), the geographic area within which critical habitat occurs may be represented as “grid squares”. These are coarse (1, 10, 50 or 100 km2) squares based on a UTM grid that serve as a flag to review the associated species’ recovery document. To reiterate, not all of the area within these boundaries is necessarily critical habitat. Critical habitat is defined in the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as “the habitat that is necessary for the survival or recovery of a listed wildlife species and that is identified as the species’ critical habitat in the recovery strategy or action plan for the species”. Critical habitat identification alone is not an automatic “protection” designation. Federal or non-federal laws or bylaws may be in place to provide protection.

  • The National Ecological Framework for Canada's "Surface Material by Ecoprovince” dataset provides surface material information within the ecoprovince framework polygon. It provides surface material codes and their English and French language descriptions as well as information about the percentage of the polygon that the component occupies. Surface material includes the abiotic material at the earth's surface. The materials can be: ICE and SNOW - Glacial ice and permanent snow ORGANIC SOIL - Contains more than 30% organic matter as measured by weight ROCK - Rock undifferentiated MINERAL SOIL - Predominantly mineral particles: contains less than 30% organic matter as measured by weight URBAN - Urban areas. Note that only a few major urban area polygons are included on SLC source maps, therefore, do not use for tabulating total urban coverage

  • The National Ecological Framework for Canada's "Soil Development by Ecodistrict” dataset contains tables that provide soil development information for components within the ecodistrict framework polygon. It provides soil development codes and their English and French-language descriptions as well as the percentage of the polygon that the component occupies. The soil development descriptions are based on the second edition of the Canadian System of Soil Classification (Agriculture Canada Expert Committee on Soil Survey, 1987).

  • The “Terrestrial Ecoregions of Canada” dataset provides representations of ecoregions. An ecoregion is a subdivision of an ecoprovince and is characterized by distinctive regional ecological factors, including climate, physiography, vegetation, soil, water, and fauna. For example, the Maritime Barrens ecoregion (no. 114) is one of nine ecoregions within the Newfoundland ecoprovince.

  • The National Ecological Framework for Canada's "Surficial Geology by Ecodistrict” dataset contains tables that provide surficial geology information with the ecodistrict framework polygons. It provides codes that characterize surficial geology (unconsolidated geologic materials) and their English and French-language descriptions as well as information about the area and percentage of the polygon that the material occupies.

  • The National Ecological Framework for Canada's "Surface Form by Ecozone" dataset contains tables that provide surface form information for components within the ecozone framework polygon. It provides surface form codes and their English and French-language descriptions as well as information about the percentage of the polygon that the component occupies. Surface form descriptions describe assemblages of slopes or recurring patterns of forms that occur at the earth's surface. When applied to consolidated materials (material that has been transformed to hard rock), it refers to the form produced after modification by geological processes. The mineral soil surface forms are: dissected; hummocky (irregular); inclined; level, rolling; ridged; steep; terraced; undulating. The wetland surface forms are: bog; fen; marsh; swamp.

  • The National Ecological Framework for Canada's "Total Land and Water Area by Ecoregion” dataset provides land and water area values for ecoregion framework polygons, in hectares. It includes attributes for a polygon’s total area, land-only area and large water body area.

  • The National Ecological Framework for Canada's "Total Land and Water Area by Ecoprovince” dataset provides land and water area values for ecoprovince framework polygons, in hectares. It includes attributes for a polygon’s total area, land-only area and large water body area.